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The Non-Linear Effect of Chinese Financial Developments on Energy Supply Structures

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  • Jian Chai

    () (International Business School, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    School of Economics and Management, Xidian University, Xi’an 710126, China
    Institute of Cross-Process Perception and Control, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China)

  • Limin Xing

    () (International Business School, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    Institute of Cross-Process Perception and Control, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China)

  • Quanying Lu

    () (International Business School, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    Institute of Cross-Process Perception and Control, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China)

  • Ting Liang

    () (International Business School, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    Institute of Cross-Process Perception and Control, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China)

  • Kin Keung Lai

    () (International Business School, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    Institute of Cross-Process Perception and Control, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119, China
    Department of Management Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hongkong, China)

  • Shouyang Wang

    () (Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080, China)

Abstract

Currently, oversupply coal and coal-based power in China poses a great challenge to energy structure optimization and emissions reduction. The energy industry, however, is closely linked to the financial sector. In view of this, using a non-linear Panel Smooth Transition Regression (PSTR) model, this paper examines the threshold effects of financial developments on energy supply structures for 17 energy supply provinces in China observed over 2000–2014. The main results are: (1) The ratio of coal supply (LCSR) specification is seen to be a four-regime PSTR model with added value in the financial industry/GDP (LFIR) as the threshold variable. The LFIR and LCSR show a positive correlation, and the elastic coefficients change between 0.02 and ~0.085; the impact of financial institutions’ loan balance/GDP (LLAN) on LCSR takes on an inverse U-shaped curve: first positive, then negative, and again positive with the financial crisis in 2008 as the turning point; (2) The ratio of thermal power generation (LTPG) specification is seen to be a two-regime PSTR model with investment in the coal industry/GDP (LCIR) as the threshold variable. Results show that LFIR has a negative effect on LTPG, and the coefficients in the low regime tend to be 0.344%, then gradually decrease to 0.051% in the high regime. The influence of LLAN on the LTPG is positive before and negative after the financial crisis. The influence of the foreign direct investment GDP proportion (LFDI, the degree of financial openness) on the LCSR and LTPG both remain negative. Therefore, in the process of formulating energy conservation policies and adjusting energy-intensive industrial structures, the government should fully consider the effect of financial developments.

Suggested Citation

  • Jian Chai & Limin Xing & Quanying Lu & Ting Liang & Kin Keung Lai & Shouyang Wang, 2016. "The Non-Linear Effect of Chinese Financial Developments on Energy Supply Structures," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-21, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:10:p:1021-:d:80393
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial development; energy supply structure; PSTR model; regime switching;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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