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Evolutionary Plant Breeding in Cereals—Into a New Era

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas F. Döring

    () (The Organic Research Centre, Hamstead Marshall, Newbury, Berkshire RG20 0HR, UK)

  • Samuel Knapp

    () (Institute of Plant Breeding, Seed Science and Population Genetics, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstraße 21, Stuttgart 70599, Germany)

  • Geza Kovacs

    () (Department of Genetic Resources and Organic Plant Breeding, Brunszvik u. 2, Martonvásár 2462, Hungary)

  • Kevin Murphy

    () (Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, 291D Johnson Hall, Pullman, WA 99164, USA)

  • Martin S. Wolfe

    () (The Organic Research Centre, Hamstead Marshall, Newbury, Berkshire RG20 0HR, UK)

Abstract

In evolutionary plant breeding, crop populations with a high level of genetic diversity are subjected to the forces of natural selection. In a cycle of sowing and re-sowing seed from the plant population year after year, those plants favored under prevailing growing conditions are expected to contribute more seed to the next generation than plants with lower fitness. Thus, evolving crop populations have the capability of adapting to the conditions under which they are grown. Here we review the current state of research in evolutionary plant breeding and concentrate on the ability of evolving plant populations to deal with stressful, variable, and unpredictable environments. This resilience of evolving plant populations is seen as a major advantage under the predicted threats faced by agriculture such as global climate change. We have conducted an analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of this breeding approach and suggest how its concept can be broadened and expanded. Given the current legal restrictions for realizing the potential of evolutionary plant breeding, we call for a change in legislation to allow evolving crop populations to enter agricultural practice on a larger scale.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas F. Döring & Samuel Knapp & Geza Kovacs & Kevin Murphy & Martin S. Wolfe, 2011. "Evolutionary Plant Breeding in Cereals—Into a New Era," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(10), pages 1-28, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:3:y:2011:i:10:p:1944-1971:d:14375
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nelson, Gerald C. & Rosegrant, Mark W. & Koo, Jawoo & Robertson, Richard & Sulser, Timothy & Zhu, Tingju & Ringler, Claudia & Msangi, Siwa & Palazzo, Amanda & Batka, Miroslav & Magalhaes, Marilia & Va, 2009. "Climate change: Impact on agriculture and costs of adaptation," Food policy reports 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edwin Nuijten & Monika M. Messmer & Edith T. Lammerts van Bueren, 2016. "Concepts and Strategies of Organic Plant Breeding in Light of Novel Breeding Techniques," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, December.
    2. Salvatore Ceccarelli, 2014. "GM Crops, Organic Agriculture and Breeding for Sustainability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-14, July.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:8:p:1321-:d:106241 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    composite cross populations; competition; diversity; farm-saved seed; resilience;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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