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Ambidextrous Leadership, Social Entrepreneurial Orientation, and Operational Performance

Author

Listed:
  • Carla Martínez-Climent

    () (IUDESCOOP Institute-UV, 46022 Valencia, Spain)

  • María Rodríguez-García

    () (ESIC Business & Marketing School, 46021 Valencia, Spain)

  • Juying Zeng

    () (School of Data Science, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hang Zhou 310018, China)

Abstract

In the knowledge era, new forms of organizing and managing firms emerge to adapt to new situations. One such new form of organizational management is ambidextrous leadership. Ambidextrous leadership combines opening leader behaviors, such as promoting creativity, and closing leader behaviors, such as accomplishing objectives and adhering to norms. Thus, the aim is to demonstrate that a social orientation is not at odds with measures of operational performance other than profitability. The purpose of this study is to examine how ambidextrous leadership is linked to social entrepreneurial orientation and how this in turn affects operational performance. This is done through a rigorous review of the literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Carla Martínez-Climent & María Rodríguez-García & Juying Zeng, 2019. "Ambidextrous Leadership, Social Entrepreneurial Orientation, and Operational Performance," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-15, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:3:p:890-:d:204463
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lina Liu & Bo Yu & Weiwei Wu, 2019. "The Formation and Effects of Exploitative Dynamic Capabilities and Explorative Dynamic Capabilities: An Empirical Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-21, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ambidextrous leadership; social entrepreneurial orientation; innovation; operational performance;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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