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Social Entrepreneurship: A Critique and Future Directions

Author

Listed:
  • M. Tina Dacin

    () (Queen's School of Business, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada)

  • Peter A. Dacin

    () (Queen's School of Business, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6, Canada)

  • Paul Tracey

    () (Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1AG, United Kingdom)

Abstract

Work on social entrepreneurship constitutes a field of study that intersects a number of domains, including entrepreneurial studies, social innovation, and nonprofit management. Scholars are beginning to contribute to the development of this new discipline through efforts that attempt to trace the emergence of social entrepreneurship as well as by comparing it to other organizational activities such as conventional entrepreneurship. However, as a nascent field, social entrepreneurship scholars are in the midst of a number of debates involving definitional and conceptual clarity, boundaries of the field, and a struggle to arrive at a set of relevant and meaningful research questions. This paper examines the promise of social entrepreneurship as a domain of inquiry and suggests a number of research areas and research questions for future study.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Tina Dacin & Peter A. Dacin & Paul Tracey, 2011. "Social Entrepreneurship: A Critique and Future Directions," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 22(5), pages 1203-1213, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ororsc:v:22:y:2011:i:5:p:1203-1213
    DOI: 10.1287/orsc.1100.0620
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.1100.0620
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Weerawardena, Jay & Mort, Gillian Sullivan, 2006. "Investigating social entrepreneurship: A multidimensional model," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 21-35, February.
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    4. Seelos, Christian & Mair, Johanna, 2005. "Social entrepreneurship: Creating new business models to serve the poor," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 241-246.
    5. Roger Spear, 2006. "Social entrepreneurship: a different model?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(5/6), pages 339-410, May.
    6. Zahra, Shaker A. & Gedajlovic, Eric & Neubaum, Donald O. & Shulman, Joel M., 2009. "A typology of social entrepreneurs: Motives, search processes and ethical challenges," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 519-532, September.
    7. Bernauer, Thomas & Caduff, Ladina, 2004. "In Whose Interest? Pressure Group Politics, Economic Competition and Environmental Regulation," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 99-126, May.
    8. Peredo, Ana María & McLean, Murdith, 2006. "Social entrepreneurship: A critical review of the concept," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 56-65, February.
    9. Paul Tracey & Nelson Phillips & Owen Jarvis, 2011. "Bridging Institutional Entrepreneurship and the Creation of New Organizational Forms: A Multilevel Model," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 22(1), pages 60-80, February.
    10. Mair, Johanna & Martí, Ignasi, 2006. "Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 36-44, February.
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