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Building Regional Sustainable Development Scenarios with the SSP Framework

Author

Listed:
  • Shuhui Yang

    () (School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China)

  • Xuefeng Cui

    () (School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
    School of Mathematics and Statistics, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland)

Abstract

Climate change is having an increasing effect on human society and ecosystems. The United Nations has established 17 sustainable development goals, one of which is to cope with climate change. How to scientifically explore uncertainties and hazards brought about by climate change in the future is crucial. The new Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has proposed shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) to project climate change scenarios. SSP has been analyzed globally, but how regions and nations respond to the global climate change and mitigation policies is seldom explored, which do not meet the demand for regional environmental assessment and social sustainable development. Therefore, in this paper, we reviewed and discussed how SSPs were applied to regions, and this can be summarized into four main categories: (1) integrated assessment model (IAM) scenario analysis, (2) SSPs-RCPs-SPAs framework scenario analysis, (3) downscaling global impact assessment model, and (4) regional impact assessment model simulation. The study provides alternative ways to project land use, water resource, energy, and ecosystem service in regions, which can carry out related policies and actions to address climate change in advance and help achieve sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Shuhui Yang & Xuefeng Cui, 2019. "Building Regional Sustainable Development Scenarios with the SSP Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(20), pages 1-13, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:20:p:5712-:d:276959
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nigel Arnell & Ben Lloyd-Hughes, 2014. "The global-scale impacts of climate change on water resources and flooding under new climate and socio-economic scenarios," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 127-140, January.
    2. Schaeffer, Michiel & Gohar, Laila & Kriegler, Elmar & Lowe, Jason & Riahi, Keywan & van Vuuren, Detlef, 2015. "Mid- and long-term climate projections for fragmented and delayed-action scenarios," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PA), pages 257-268.
    3. Mouratiadou, Ioanna & Biewald, Anne & Pehl, Michaja & Bonsch, Markus & Baumstark, Lavinia & Klein, David & Popp, Alexander & Luderer, Gunnar & Kriegler, Elmar, 2016. "The impact of climate change mitigation on water demand for energy and food: An integrated analysis based on the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways," Environmental Science & Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 48-58.
    4. Dumenu, William Kwadwo & Obeng, Elizabeth Asantewaa, 2016. "Climate change and rural communities in Ghana: Social vulnerability, impacts, adaptations and policy implications," Environmental Science & Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(P1), pages 208-217.
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    6. Levesque, Antoine & Pietzcker, Robert C. & Baumstark, Lavinia & De Stercke, Simon & Grübler, Arnulf & Luderer, Gunnar, 2018. "How much energy will buildings consume in 2100? A global perspective within a scenario framework," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 514-527.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs); regional scenario; sustainable development;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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