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A Study on the Factors Affecting China’s Direct Household Carbon Emission and Comparison of Regional Differences

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  • Jingbo Fan

    () (School of Public Administration, University of International Business and Economics, No. 10, Huixindongjie, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, China)

  • Aobo Ran

    () (School of Social Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China)

  • Xiaomeng Li

    () (School of Social Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China)

Abstract

As the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, China has been attracting attention. In the global carbon emission structure, the proportion of household carbon emissions continues to increase, and it is necessary to focus on the issue of household emissions. Based on the perspective of the family sector and the comparison of urban–rural and interprovincial differences, this study makes a thorough and systematic analysis of the factors affecting direct household carbon emissions. The average carbon emission of urban households is higher than that of rural households. Both personal background and household energy consumption facility use have important impacts on household carbon emissions, and the degree of impact varies between urban and rural areas and between provinces. Reducing household carbon emissions and achieving a harmonious coexistence between man and nature are the common goals of the government and society. The government should explore the model of green sustainable development on the basis of ensuring the energy needs of residents. Residents should also further establish a low-carbon life concept and focus on the cultivation of low-carbon lifestyles.

Suggested Citation

  • Jingbo Fan & Aobo Ran & Xiaomeng Li, 2019. "A Study on the Factors Affecting China’s Direct Household Carbon Emission and Comparison of Regional Differences," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(18), pages 1-14, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:18:p:4919-:d:265511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    direct household carbon emission; influencing factor; urban–rural gap; interprovincial gap;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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