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A Derivation of Factors Influencing the Successful Integration of Corporate Volunteers into Public Flood Disaster Inquiry and Notification Systems

Author

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  • Chia-Lee Yang

    () (National Center for High-Performance Computing, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan)

  • Ming-Chang Shieh

    () (10th River Management Office, Water Resources Agency, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei 106, Taiwan
    Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan)

  • Chi-Yo Huang

    () (Department of Industrial Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan)

  • Ching-Pin Tung

    () (Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan)

Abstract

Flood hazards have become increasingly common and serious over the last few centuries. Volunteers can observe instant flood information in their local environment, which presents a great opportunity to gather flood information. The information provided by individual volunteers is too much for them to truly understand. Corporate volunteers can offer more accurate and truthful information due to their understanding of the roles and requirements of specific tasks. Past studies of factors influencing the success of corporate volunteers in flood disaster are limited. Thus, this research aims to derive the factors that enable corporate volunteers to successfully integrate the flood information to help reduce the number of injuries and deaths being caused by flood disasters. This research used the information success model and the public-private partnership (PPP) model to develop an analytic framework. The nature of flood disaster management problems is inherently complex, time-bound, and multifaceted. Therefore, we proposed a novel hybrid multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) model to address the key influence factors and the cause-effect relationships between factors. An empirical study in Taiwanese public flood disaster inquiry and notification systems was used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. The research results can serve as guidelines for improving the government’s policies and the public sector in the context of corporate volunteer involvement in flood disaster inquiry and notification and in relation to other natural and manmade disasters.

Suggested Citation

  • Chia-Lee Yang & Ming-Chang Shieh & Chi-Yo Huang & Ching-Pin Tung, 2018. "A Derivation of Factors Influencing the Successful Integration of Corporate Volunteers into Public Flood Disaster Inquiry and Notification Systems," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-31, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:1973-:d:152068
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrey Berezin & Bruno S. Sergi & Natalia Gorodnova, 2018. "Efficiency Assessment of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Projects: The Case of Russia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-18, October.
    2. Chi-Yo Huang & Pei-Han Chung & Joseph Z. Shyu & Yao-Hua Ho & Chao-Hsin Wu & Ming-Che Lee & Ming-Jenn Wu, 2018. "Evaluation and Selection of Materials for Particulate Matter MEMS Sensors by Using Hybrid MCDM Methods," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(10), pages 1-35, September.
    3. Steven Bauer & Dongkuk Lim, 2019. "Effect of Communication Practices on Volunteer Organization Identification and Retention," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-17, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public-private partnership (PPP); disaster notification system; flood disaster; information system success model; multiple criteria decision making (MCDM);

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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