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Effect of Communication Practices on Volunteer Organization Identification and Retention

Author

Listed:
  • Steven Bauer

    () (Business Administration Division, Seaver College, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90263, USA)

  • Dongkuk Lim

    () (Business Administration Division, Seaver College, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90263, USA)

Abstract

Volunteering has taken on growing significance as a benefit to society and in initiatives to promote sustainability; it is therefore important to understand the factors driving its success. One increasingly studied variable with a positive effect on volunteer behavior and retention is organization identification. The antecedents influencing the organization identification variable, however, have not yet been explored in the volunteer literature. We address this gap by implementing a survey among volunteers at the OUR HOUSE Grief Support Center in Los Angeles and analyzing results via simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Specifically, we investigate whether or not communication factors affect both organization identification and volunteer intention to continue. We find that specific communication factors, including a relationship with one’s supervisor, internal communication, and external social media postings significantly increase the level of organization identification and retention. Our findings are consistent with the theories of leader-member exchange and absorption capacity. Practitioners and nonprofits can improve the organizational environment of volunteers by optimizing these communication practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Bauer & Dongkuk Lim, 2019. "Effect of Communication Practices on Volunteer Organization Identification and Retention," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-17, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:9:p:2467-:d:226162
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chia-Lee Yang & Ming-Chang Shieh & Chi-Yo Huang & Ching-Pin Tung, 2018. "A Derivation of Factors Influencing the Successful Integration of Corporate Volunteers into Public Flood Disaster Inquiry and Notification Systems," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-31, June.
    2. Thakor, Mrugank V. & Joshi, Ashwin W., 2005. "Motivating salesperson customer orientation: insights from the job characteristics model," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 584-592, May.
    3. Rashmi Nakra, 2006. "Relationship between Communication Satisfaction and Organizational Identification: An Empirical Study," Vision, , vol. 10(2), pages 41-51, April.
    4. Kristína Pompurová & Radka Marčeková & Ľubica Šebová & Jana Sokolová & Matej Žofaj, 2018. "Volunteer Tourism as a Sustainable Form of Tourism—The Case of Organized Events," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-12, May.
    5. Yingyan Wang, 2011. "Mission-Driven Organizations in Japan: Management Philosophy and Individual Outcomes," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 101(1), pages 111-126, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mercedes Aranda & Salvatore Zappalà & Gabriela Topa, 2019. "Motivations for Volunteerism, Satisfaction, and Emotional Exhaustion: The Moderating Effect of Volunteers’ Age," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(16), pages 1-16, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    volunteering; organization identification; retention; relationship with supervisor; internal communication; social media; mission statement; leader-member exchange theory; absorption capacity theory;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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