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Re-Examining Embodied SO 2 and CO 2 Emissions in China

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  • Rui Huang

    () (Nanjing Normal University, Key Laboratory of Virtual Geographic Environment for the Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210023, China
    Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing 210023, China)

  • Klaus Hubacek

    () (Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, USA
    Department of Environmental Studies, Masaryk University, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic)

  • Kuishuang Feng

    () (Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, USA)

  • Xiaojie Li

    () (Institute of Space and Earth Information Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China)

  • Chao Zhang

    () (School of Economics and Management, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China)

Abstract

CO 2 and SO 2, while having different environmental impacts, are both linked to the burning of fossil fuels. Research on joint patterns of CO 2 emissions and SO 2 emissions may provide useful information for decision-makers to reduce these emissions effectively. This study analyzes both CO 2 emissions and SO 2 emissions embodied in interprovincial trade in 2007 and 2010 using multi-regional input–output analysis. Backward and forward linkage analysis shows that Production and Supply of Electric Power and Steam, Non-metal Mineral Products, and Metal Smelting and Pressing are key sectors for mitigating SO 2 and CO 2 emissions along the national supply chain. The total SO 2 emissions and CO 2 emissions of these sectors accounted for 81% and 76% of the total national SO 2 emissions and CO 2 emissions, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Rui Huang & Klaus Hubacek & Kuishuang Feng & Xiaojie Li & Chao Zhang, 2018. "Re-Examining Embodied SO 2 and CO 2 Emissions in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-17, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1505-:d:145513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Li-Jing & Liang, Qiao-Mei & Creutzig, Felix & Ward, Hauke & Zhang, Kun, 2020. "Sweet spots are in the food system: Structural adjustments to co-control regional pollutants and national GHG emissions in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    multi-regional input–output analysis; CO 2 emissions; SO 2 emissions; interregional trade;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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