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The Growth Path of Agricultural Labor Productivity in China: A Latent Growth Curve Model at the Prefectural Level

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  • Peng Bin

    () (School of International Studies, University of Trento, Via Tommaso Gar 14, Trento 38122, Italy
    College of Public Administration, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China)

  • Marco Vassallo

    () (Agricultural Research Council (CRA), Via Ardeatina 546, Rome 00178, Italy)

Abstract

Given the shrinking proportion of agriculture output and the growing mobility of the labor force in China, how agricultural labor productivity develops has become an increasingly attractive topic for researchers and policy makers. This study aims to depict the development trajectory of agricultural labor productivity in China after its WTO entry. Based on a balanced panel data containing 287 Chinese prefectures from 2000 to 2013, this study applies the Latent Growth Curve Model (LGCM) and finds that the agricultural labor productivity follows a piecewise growth path with two breaking points in the years of 2004 and 2009. This may stem from some exogenous stimulus, such as supporting policies launched in the breaking years. Further statistical analysis shows an expanding gap of agricultural labor productivity among different Chinese prefectures.

Suggested Citation

  • Peng Bin & Marco Vassallo, 2016. "The Growth Path of Agricultural Labor Productivity in China: A Latent Growth Curve Model at the Prefectural Level," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(3), pages 1-20, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jecomi:v:4:y:2016:i:3:p:13-:d:73090
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    agricultural labor productivity; growth trend; divergence; agricultural reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics
    • F - International Economics
    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics

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