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Why small businesses were hit harder by the recent recession

Author

Listed:
  • Aysegül Sahin
  • Sagiri Kitao
  • Anna Cororaton
  • Sergiu Laiu

Abstract

Although both large and small businesses felt the sting of job losses during the 2007-09 downturn, small firms experienced disproportionate declines. A study of the recession’s employment effect on small firms suggests that poor sales and economic uncertainty were the main reasons for their weak performance and sluggish recovery—problems that affected large firms too, but to a lesser degree. Although a tightened credit supply constrained some small firms, weak consumer demand for the firms’ products and services was a more pressing factor, reducing revenues and dampening new investment spending.

Suggested Citation

  • Aysegül Sahin & Sagiri Kitao & Anna Cororaton & Sergiu Laiu, 2011. "Why small businesses were hit harder by the recent recession," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 17(July).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2011:i:july:n:v.17no.4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gertler & Simon Gilchrist, 1994. "Monetary Policy, Business Cycles, and the Behavior of Small Manufacturing Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 309-340.
    2. John Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2010. "Who Creates Jobs? Small vs. Large vs. Young," Working Papers 10-17, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    3. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1996. "The Financial Accelerator and the Flight to Quality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 1-15, February.
    4. Charles Steindel & David A. Brauer, 1994. "Credit supply constraints on business activity, excluding construction," Monograph, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, number 1994cscobe.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kudlyak, Marianna & Sánchez, Juan M., 2017. "Revisiting the behavior of small and large firms during the 2008 financial crisis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 48-69.
    2. Colleen Kamen & Christopher Behrer, 2012. "Navigating uncertainty and growing jobs: considering small employer firm resilience during challenging economic times," Community Development Investment Center Working Paper 2012-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    3. Lai, Yanqing & Saridakis, George & Blackburn, Robert & Johnstone, Stewart, 2016. "Are the HR responses of small firms different from large firms in times of recession?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 113-131.
    4. Sung-Eun Yu, 2017. "The Behavior of Small and Large Firms during Business Cycle Episodes and during Monetary Policy Episodes: A Comparison of Earlier and Recent Periods," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2017_05, University of Utah, Department of Economics.

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