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How economic news moves markets

Author

Listed:
  • Leonardo Bartolini
  • Linda S. Goldberg
  • Adam Sacarny

Abstract

Exploring how the release of new economic data affects asset prices in the stock, bond, and foreign exchange markets, the authors find that only a few announcements - the nonfarm payroll numbers, the GDP advance release, and a private sector manufacturing report - generate price responses that are economically significant and measurably persistent. Bond yields show the strongest response and stock prices the weakest. The authors' analysis of the direction of these effects suggests that news of stronger-than-expected growth and inflation generally prompts a rise in bond yields and the exchange value of the dollar.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardo Bartolini & Linda S. Goldberg & Adam Sacarny, 2008. "How economic news moves markets," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Aug).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2008:i:aug:n:v.14no.6
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anne Opschoor & Michel van der Wel & Dick van Dijk & Nick Taylor, 2011. "On the Effects of Private Information on Volatility," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-077/4, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Michael D. Bauer, 2015. "Nominal Interest Rates and the News," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(2-3), pages 295-332, March.
    3. Daniel L. Thornton, 2014. "The identification of the response of interest rates to monetary policy actions using market-based measures of monetary policy shocks," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 67-87, January.
    4. Joseph E. Gagnon & Tamim Bayoumi & Juan M. Londono & Christian Saborowski & Horacio Sapriza, 2017. "Direct and Spillover Effects of Unconventional Monetary and Exchange Rate Policies," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 191-232, April.
    5. Koch, Christoffer & Yung, Julieta, 2016. "Macroeconomic news and asset prices before and after the zero lower bound," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 287, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    6. Works, Richard Floyd, 2016. "Econometric modeling of exchange rate determinants by market classification: An empirical analysis of Japan and South Korea using the sticky-price monetary theory," MPRA Paper 76382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Deniz Erdemlioglu & Sébastien Laurent & Christopher J. Neely, 2013. "Econometric modeling of exchange rate volatility and jumps," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Finance, chapter 16, pages 373-427 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Frankel, Jeffrey & Saiki, Ayako, 2016. "Does It Matter If Statistical Agencies Frame the Month's CPI Report on a 1-Month or 12-Month Basis?," Working Paper Series 16-011, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    9. Christopher J. Neely, 2011. "A survey of announcement effects on foreign exchange volatility and jumps," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 361-385.
    10. James D. Hamilton & Seth Pruitt & Scott Borger, 2011. "Estimating the Market-Perceived Monetary Policy Rule," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 1-28, July.
    11. Thomas Gilbert & Chiara Scotti & Georg H. Strasser & Clara Vega, 2015. "Is the Intrinsic Value of Macroeconomic News Announcements Related to Their Asset Price Impact?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 874, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 23 Apr 2015.
    12. Linda S. Goldberg & Christian Grisse, 2013. "Time Variation in Asset Price Responses to Macro Announcements," NBER Working Papers 19523, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Linda S. Goldberg & Michael W. Klein, 2011. "Evolving Perceptions of Central Bank Credibility: The European Central Bank Experience," NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 153-182.
    14. Adrian Jäggi & Martin Schlegel & Attilio Zanetti, 2016. "Macroeconomic surprises, market environment and safe-haven currencies," Working Papers 2016-15, Swiss National Bank.
    15. Opschoor, Anne & Taylor, Nick & van der Wel, Michel & van Dijk, Dick, 2014. "Order flow and volatility: An empirical investigation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 185-201.
    16. Bok, Brandyn & Caratelli, Daniele & Giannone, Domenico & Sbordone, Argia M. & Tambalotti, Andrea, 2017. "Macroeconomic nowcasting and forecasting with big data," Staff Reports 830, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    17. James D. Hamilton & Seth Pruitt & Scott C. Borger, 2009. "The market-perceived monetary policy rule," International Finance Discussion Papers 982, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    18. Brückner, Markus & Pappa, Evi, 2011. "For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics," CEPR Discussion Papers 8516, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    19. Chiou-Wei, Song-Zan & Linn, Scott C. & Zhu, Zhen, 2014. "The response of U.S. natural gas futures and spot prices to storage change surprises: Fundamental information and the effect of escalating physical gas production," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 156-173.

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