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For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics

  • Brückner, Markus
  • Pappa, Evi

The hosting and bidding for the Olympic Games is a natural experiment to test for anticipation effects in macroeconomics. We examine these effects using panel data for 184 countries during the period 1950-2006. We find that hosting the Games generates positive investment, consumption, and output responses already before the hosting of the Games. We also detect significant anticipation effects in countries that bid for the Games. While bidding for the Games has a transitory level effect, hosting the Games has a permanent level effect.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8516.

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Date of creation: Aug 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8516
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  1. Andrew K. Rose & Mark M. Spiegel, 2011. "The Olympic Effect," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(553), pages 652-677, 06.
  2. Refet Gürkaynak & Brian Sack & Eric Swanson, 2004. "Do actions speak louder than words? the response of asset prices to monetary policy actions and statements," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-66, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Refet S. Gürkaynak & Brian Sack & Eric Swanson, 2005. "The Sensitivity of Long-Term Interest Rates to Economic News: Evidence and Implications for Macroeconomic Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 425-436, March.
  4. Leonardo Bartolini & Linda Goldberg & Adam Sacarny, 2008. "How economic news moves markets," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Aug).
  5. Hardouvelis, Gikas A, 1987. " Reserves Announcements and Interest Rates: Does Monetary Policy Matter?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 407-22, June.
  6. Karel Mertens & MortenO. Ravn, 2010. "Measuring the Impact of Fiscal Policy in the Face of Anticipation: A Structural VAR Approach," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 393-413, 05.
  7. Hardouvelis, Gikas A., 1988. "Economic news, exchange rates and interest rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-35, March.
  8. Brückner, Markus & Pappa, Evi, 2011. "For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics," CEPR Discussion Papers 8516, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
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