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For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics

  • Markus Bruckner

    ()

    (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

  • Evi Pappa

    ()

    (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)

We examine the effects that hosting and bidding for the Olympic Games has on macroeconomic outcomes in a panel of 184 countries spanning the period 1950-2006. Actual hosting of the Games generates positive investment, consumption, and output responses before, during, and after hosting. We detect anticipation effects: (i) bidding for the Olympic Games generates positive investment, consumption, and output responses at the time of the bidding; (ii) bidding for the Games has a transitory level effect. We confirm the presence of legacy effects: hosting the Games has a permanent level effect.

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File URL: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/research/papers/doc/wp2011-18.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Adelaide, School of Economics in its series School of Economics Working Papers with number 2011-18.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2011-18
Contact details of provider: Postal: Adelaide SA 5005
Phone: (618) 8303 5540
Web page: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/

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  1. Andrew K. Rose & Mark M. Spiegel, 2009. "The Olympic effect," Working Paper Series 2009-06, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Gurkaynak, Refet S & Sack, Brian & Swanson, Eric T, 2005. "Do Actions Speak Louder Than Words? The Response of Asset Prices to Monetary Policy Actions and Statements," MPRA Paper 820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Mertens, Karel & Ravn, Morten O, 2009. "Measuring the Impact of Fiscal Policy in the Face of Anticipation: A Structural VAR Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 7423, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Markus Bruckner & Evi Pappa, 2011. "For an Olive Wreath? Olympic Games and Anticipation Effects in Macroeconomics," School of Economics Working Papers 2011-18, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  5. Hardouvelis, Gikas A, 1987. " Reserves Announcements and Interest Rates: Does Monetary Policy Matter?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 407-22, June.
  6. Refet S. Gürkaynak & Brian Sack & Eric Swanson, 2005. "The Sensitivity of Long-Term Interest Rates to Economic News: Evidence and Implications for Macroeconomic Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 425-436, March.
  7. Leonardo Bartolini & Linda Goldberg & Adam Sacarny, 2008. "How economic news moves markets," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Aug).
  8. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
  9. Hardouvelis, Gikas A., 1988. "Economic news, exchange rates and interest rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-35, March.
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