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Direct and Spillover Effects of Unconventional Monetary and Exchange Rate Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Joseph E. Gagnon

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Tamim Bayoumi

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Juan M. Londono

    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

  • Christian Saborowski

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Horacio Sapriza

    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System)

Abstract

Abstract This paper explores the direct effects and spillovers of unconventional monetary and exchange rate policies. We find that official purchases of foreign assets have a large positive effect on a country’s current account that diminishes considerably as capital mobility rises. There is an important additional effect through the lagged stock of official assets. Official purchases of domestic assets, or quantitative easing (QE), appear to have no significant effect on a country’s current account when capital mobility is high, but there is a modest positive impact when capital mobility is low. The effects of purchases of foreign assets spill over to other countries in proportion to their degree of international financial integration. We also find that increases in US bond yields are associated with increases in foreign bond yields and in stock prices, as well as with depreciations of foreign currencies, but that all of these effects are smaller on days of US unconventional monetary policy announcements. We develop a theoretical model that is broadly consistent with our empirical results and that highlights the potential usefulness of domestic unconventional policies as responses to the effects of foreign policies of a similar type.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph E. Gagnon & Tamim Bayoumi & Juan M. Londono & Christian Saborowski & Horacio Sapriza, 2017. "Direct and Spillover Effects of Unconventional Monetary and Exchange Rate Policies," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 191-232, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:28:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11079-017-9437-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11079-017-9437-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Prasad, Eswar S., 2003. "Medium-term determinants of current accounts in industrial and developing countries: an empirical exploration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 47-76, January.
    2. Bowman, David & Londono, Juan M. & Sapriza, Horacio, 2015. "U.S. unconventional monetary policy and transmission to emerging market economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 27-59.
    3. Hausman, Joshua & Wongswan, Jon, 2011. "Global asset prices and FOMC announcements," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 547-571, April.
    4. Bayoumi, Tamim & Gagnon, Joseph & Saborowski, Christian, 2015. "Official financial flows, capital mobility, and global imbalances," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 146-174.
    5. Joseph Gagnon & Matthew Raskin & Julie Remache & Brian Sack, 2011. "The Financial Market Effects of the Federal Reserve's Large-Scale Asset Purchases," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(1), pages 3-43, March.
    6. Bayoumi, Tamim & Saborowski, Christian, 2014. "Accounting for reserves," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-29.
    7. Leonardo Bartolini & Linda S. Goldberg & Adam Sacarny, 2008. "How economic news moves markets," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 14(Aug).
    8. Ratna Sahay & Martin Cihak & Papa M N'Diaye & Adolfo Barajas & Diana B Ayala Pena & Ran Bi & Yuan Gao & Annette J Kyobe & Lam Nguyen & Christian Saborowski & Katsiaryna Svirydzenka & Seyed Reza Yousef, 2015. "Rethinking Financial Deepening; Stability and Growth in Emerging Markets," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 15/08, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph E. Gagnon, 2017. "Do Governments Drive Global Trade Imbalances?," Working Paper Series WP17-15, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    2. Jon Frost & Patty Duijm & Clemens Bonner & Leo Haan & Jakob Haan, 2019. "International Lending of Dutch Insurers and Pension Funds: the Impact of ECB Monetary Policy and Prudential Policies in the Host Country," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 445-456, July.
    3. repec:eee:ecmode:v:77:y:2019:i:c:p:276-288 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jjrfmx:v:12:y:2019:i:2:p:57-:d:220488 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:bla:jecsur:v:32:y:2018:i:5:p:1229-1256 is not listed on IDEAS

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