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Doubling your monetary base and surviving: some international experience

Author

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  • Richard G. Anderson
  • Charles S. Gascon
  • Yang Liu

Abstract

The authors examine the experience of selected central banks that have used large-scale balance-sheet expansion, frequently referred to as ?quantitative easing,? as a monetary policy instrument. The case studies focus on central banks responding to the recent financial crisis and Nordic central banks during the banking crises of the 1990s; others are provided for comparison purposes. The authors conclude that large-scale balance-sheet increases are a viable monetary policy tool provided the public believes the increase will be appropriately reversed.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard G. Anderson & Charles S. Gascon & Yang Liu, 2010. "Doubling your monetary base and surviving: some international experience," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 92(Nov), pages 481-506.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2010:i:nov:p:481-506:n:v.92no.6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shigenori Shiratsuka, 2010. "Size and Composition of the Central Bank Balance Sheet: Revisiting Japan's Experience of the Quantitative Easing Policy," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 28, pages 79-106, November.
    2. Claudio Borio & Anna Zabai, 2018. "Unconventional monetary policies: a re-appraisal," Chapters, in: Peter Conti-Brown & Rosa M. Lastra (ed.), Research Handbook on Central Banking, chapter 20, pages 398-444, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Crowe, Christopher & Meade, Ellen E., 2008. "Central bank independence and transparency: Evolution and effectiveness," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 763-777, December.
    4. Aleksander Berentsen & Christopher J. Waller, 2013. "Price-level targeting and stabilization policy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 145-164.
    5. Mr. Christopher W. Crowe & Ellen E. Meade, 2008. "Central Bank Independence and Transparency: Evolution and Effectiveness," IMF Working Papers 2008/119, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Batchelor, Roy A & Dua, Pami, 1989. "Household versus Economist Forecasts of Inflation: A Reassessment: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(2), pages 252-257, May.
    7. Richard G. Anderson, 2009. "Resolving a banking crisis, the Nordic way," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Cashing up the system
      by JP Koning in Moneyness on 2015-01-02 08:20:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Evan Karson & Christopher J. Neely, 2021. "More Stories of Unconventional Monetary Policy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 103(2), pages 207-270, April.
    2. Richard Robinson & Marwan El Nasser, 2013. "Decomposing US Money Supply Changes since the Financial Crisis," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(2), pages 1-13, June.
    3. Maria E. Canon & Limor Golan & Cody A. Smith, 2021. "Understanding the Gender Earnings Gap: Hours Worked, Occupational Sorting, and Labor Market Experience," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 103(2), pages 175-205, April.
    4. Fabian Schär, 2021. "Decentralized Finance: On Blockchain- and Smart Contract-Based Financial Markets," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 103(2), pages 153-174, April.
    5. Raphael Auer & Sebastien Kraenzlin, 2011. "International liquidity provision during the financial crisis: a view from Switzerland," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 93(Nov), pages 409-418.
    6. Ahrendsen, Bruce L., 2012. "The Global Financial Crisis: Implications For Capital To Agribusiness," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, vol. 6(1-2), pages 1-4, September.
    7. Wolfram Berger & Friedrich Kissmer, 2013. "Monetary Policy and Asset Prices: When Cleaning Up Hits the Zero Lower Bound," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 149(III), pages 291-312, September.
    8. Brett W. Fawley & Christopher J. Neely, 2013. "Four stories of quantitative easing," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 51-88.
    9. Violeta A. Gutkowski, 2021. "Lockdown Responses to COVID-19," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 103(2), pages 127-151, April.
    10. Stefan Behrendt, 2013. "Monetary Transmission via the Central Bank Balance Sheet," Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series 49-2013, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    11. Beckworth, David, 2017. "Permanent versus temporary monetary base Injections: Implications for past and future Fed Policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PA), pages 110-126.
    12. Richard G. Anderson, 2012. "Quantitative easing the Swedish way," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

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