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The acceleration in U.S. total productivity after 1995: the role of information technology

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  • John G. Fernald
  • Shanthi Ramnath

Abstract

Under standard conditions, total factor productivity (TFP) growth measures the pace of innovation or technological change in the economy. This article focuses on the period since the mid-1990s, when TFP accelerated. The authors find that most of the acceleration is accounted for by industries that use, rather than sectors that produce, information technology.

Suggested Citation

  • John G. Fernald & Shanthi Ramnath, 2004. "The acceleration in U.S. total productivity after 1995: the role of information technology," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 52-67.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2004:i:qi:p:52-67:n:v.28no.1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schiffbauer, Marc, 2008. "Catching Up or Falling Behind? The Effect of Infrastructure Capital on Technology Adoption in Transition Economies," Papers DYNREG27, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    2. PETER McADAM & ALPO WILLMAN, 2013. "Technology, Utilization, and Inflation: What Drives the New Keynesian Phillips Curve?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(8), pages 1547-1579, December.
    3. Schiffbauer, Marc, 2007. "Calling for innovations - infrastructure and sources of growth," Papers DYNREG18, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Loreto Lira & Magdalena Ugarte & Rodrigo Vergara, 2012. "Prices and market structure: an empirical analysis of the supermarket industry in Chile," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(36), pages 4731-4744, December.
    5. León-Ledesma, Miguel A. & McAdam, Peter & Willman, Alpo, 2010. "In dubio pro CES - Supply estimation with mis-specified technical change," Working Paper Series 1175, European Central Bank.

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