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Financial Stress Spillover and Financial Linkages between the Euro Area and the Czech Republic

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Abstract

This article analyzes the transmission of financial systemic stress from the euro area to the Czech Republic. We employ a recently developed composite indicator of systemic stress (CISS), which has a unique construction reflecting the correlations between markets and so captures the systemic stress of the financial system. The results from time-varying regression with stochastic volatility estimated using Bayesian inference indicate that the degree of transmission depends significantly on the level of stress, i.e., the intensity of the transmission mechanism itself is given by the magnitude of the shock. Second, the analysis reveals a more complex structure of financial stress linkages between markets on both the domestic and the international level. Finally, the results also support the current findings that the nature of stress is important for the transmission and that the sovereign debt crisis has so far had a limited impact on Czech financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Adam & Sona Benecka, 2013. "Financial Stress Spillover and Financial Linkages between the Euro Area and the Czech Republic," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(1), pages 46-64, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:63:y:2013:i:1:p:46-64
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    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Adam & Sona Benecka & Jakub Mateju, 2014. "Risk Aversion, Financial Stress and Their Non-Linear Impact on Exchange Rates," Working Papers 2014/07, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    2. Narcisa Kadlcakova & Lubos Komarek & Zlatuse Komarkova & Michal Hlavacek, 2016. "Identification of Asset Price Misalignments on Financial Markets With Extreme Value Theory," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(11), pages 2595-2609, November.
    3. Elod Takáts & Abraham Vela, 2014. "International monetary policy transmission," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to the emerging markets, volume 78, pages 25-44 Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Tomas Adam & Miroslav Plasil, 2014. "The Impact of Financial Variables on Czech Macroeconomic Developments: An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers 2014/11, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    5. Harald Schmidbauer & Angi Rösch & Erhan Uluceviz & Narod Erkol, 2016. "The Russian Stock Market during the Ukrainian Crisis: A Network Perspective," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 66(6), pages 478-509, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    systemic risk; financial crises; financial stress index; financial linkages;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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