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Transformations in Agriculture and their Implications for Rural Development

  • Peter Hazell


    (Visiting Professsor Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, Wye Campus)

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    The paper reviews the implications for rural development of current transformations in agriculture. It first identifies some of the driving forces - in addition to the impact of rising incomes in some but not all developing countries - behind the transformation process: changing market chains, shifts in public policy, OECD agricultural policies and HIV/AIDS. It then discusses some strategic issues for assisting the rural sector and small farms in developing countries: increasing the productivity of food staples, diversification into higher value products, organizing small farmer for marketing, agricultural services, non-farm opportunities and migration and targeting the vulnerable. It emphasizes the need for integrated interventions if small farm development is to offer a viable pro-poor option for agricultural development.

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    Article provided by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in its journal The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 47-65

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    Handle: RePEc:fao:tejade:v:4:y:2007:i:1:p:47-65
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    1. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2002. "Reforming agricultural markets in Africa," Food policy statements 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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