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Modelling the nonlinear relationship between co2 emissions and energy consumption: new evidence on the role of economic growth

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  • Raheem Ibrahim Dolapo
  • Kazeem O. Isah

Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between CO2 emissions and energy consumption while simultaneously accounting for the role of economic growth. Although a few recent studies have paid attention to the nonlinear relationship between the first two variables, no study that we are aware of, has considered these three variables simultaneously. Using data covering 21 countries for the period 1986-2010, the study found the existence of one threshold level of economic growth, which stood at 5.5 percent. It was also found that above this threshold level, CO2 emissions impact more on energy consumption and vice-versa. Policy implication is drawn from these results.

Suggested Citation

  • Raheem Ibrahim Dolapo & Kazeem O. Isah, 2015. "Modelling the nonlinear relationship between co2 emissions and energy consumption: new evidence on the role of economic growth," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(1), pages 59-70.
  • Handle: RePEc:fan:efeefe:v:html10.3280/efe2015-001005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Villar-Rubio & María Dolores Huete Morales, 2016. "Energy, transport, pollution and natural resources: Key elements in ecological taxation," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2016(1), pages 111-122.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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