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Labour Market Regulation and Migration in Ireland

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  • Frank Walsh

    (University College Dublin)

Abstract

We demonstrate that a disproportionately large fraction of migrants in Ireland enter sectors with regulated wages and working conditions. There is a substantial wage penalty associated with being a migrant that varies across migrant groups but disappears within regulated sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Walsh, 2013. "Labour Market Regulation and Migration in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(1), pages 85-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:44:y:2013:i:1:p:85-102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barrett, Alan & McCarthy, Yvonne, 2007. "The Earnings of Immigrants in Ireland: Results from the 2005 EU Survey of Income and Living Conditions," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), vol. 2007(4-Winter), pages 42-62.
    2. Alan Barrett & Adele Bergin & David Duffy, 2006. "The Labour Market Characteristics and Labour Market Impacts of Immigrants in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(1), pages 1-26.
    3. Alan Barrett & Adele Bergin & Elish Kelly, 2011. "Estimating the Impact of Immigration on the Wages in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 42(1), pages 01-26.
    4. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    5. Heather Antecol & Peter Kuhn & Stephen J. Trejo, 2006. "Assimilation via Prices or Quantities?: Sources of Immigrant Earnings Growth in Australia, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
    6. Alan Barrett & Séamus McGuinness & Martin O'Brien, 2012. "The Immigrant Earnings Disadvantage across the Earnings and Skills Distributions: The Case of Immigrants from the EU's New Member States," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 50(3), pages 457-481, September.
    7. McGuinness, Seamus & Kelly, Elish & O'Connell, Philip J., 2008. "The Impact of Wage Bargaining Regime on Firm-Level Competitiveness and Wage Inequality: The Case of Ireland," Papers WP266, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Barry R. Chiswick & Anh T. Le & Paul W. Miller, 2008. "How Immigrants Fare across the Earnings Distribution in Australia and the United States," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 353-373, April.
    9. Antecol, Heather & Kuhn, Peter J. & Trejo, Stephen, 2003. "Assimilation via Prices or Quantities? Labor Market Institutions and Immigrant Earnings Growth in Australia, Canada, and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 802, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Colin Whitston, 2014. "The reform of Joint Labour Committees—the re-commodification of labour?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(5), pages 409-423, September.

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