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Europeanisation of Regional Development Policies? Linking the Multi-Level Governance Approach with Theories of Policy Learning and Policy Change

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  • Conzelmann, Thomas

Abstract

The article explores the effects of non-regulatory EC policies on policy development at member state level. Taking EC regional policy and a recent reform of German regional policy as examples, it is suggested that the EC context may matter for policy development (1) through changing preferences of actors involved in regional policy-making, (2) through the mobilisation of new actors and the emergence of new actor coalitions in domestic policy domains, and (3) through serving as a source of inspiration for policy-makers looking for alternative policy ideas. In developing such thoughts, the article seeks to understand the influence of supranational factors as an integral part of domestic policy-making (rather than an external constraint). On a more abstract level, the aim is to link contributions from the field of policy analysis with the literature on multi-level governance.

Suggested Citation

  • Conzelmann, Thomas, 1998. "Europeanisation of Regional Development Policies? Linking the Multi-Level Governance Approach with Theories of Policy Learning and Policy Change," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 2, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:erp:eiopxx:p0027
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bennett, Colin J., 1991. "What Is Policy Convergence and What Causes It?," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(2), pages 215-233, April.
    2. Frieden, Jeffry A., 1991. "Invested interests: the politics of national economic policies in a world of global finance," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(4), pages 425-451, October.
    3. Christopher K. Ansell & Craig A. Parsons & Keith A. Darden, 1997. "Dual Networks in European Regional Development Policy," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 347-375, September.
    4. Gourevitch, Peter, 1978. "The second image reversed: the international sources of domestic politics," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(4), pages 881-912, October.
    5. Rose, Richard, 1991. "What is Lesson-Drawing?," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 3-30, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Bachtler & Carlos Mendez, 2007. "Who Governs EU Cohesion Policy? Deconstructing the Reforms of the Structural Funds," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45, pages 535-564, September.
    2. Jale Tosun, 2014. "Absorption of Regional Funds: A Comparative Analysis," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 371-387, March.

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