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Environmental regulation, green R&D and the Porter hypothesis

Author

Listed:
  • Indrani Roy Chowdhury
  • Sandwip K. Das

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of environmental regulation on green R&D, as well as to characterize the conditions under which the Porter hypothesis, both the weak as well as the strict version, may or may not hold. Design/methodology/approach - The authors use a simple two-stage model with environmental R&D and endogenously determined abatement costs to address these issues. Findings - In a monopoly framework, the authors identify a channel arising out of the replacement effect that may increase R&D incentives following stricter regulation. It was found that the Porter hypothesis, both the weak as well as the strong version, is likely to hold if the new technology is relatively efficient in production, but not otherwise. Originality/value - The paper makes a contribution towards the debate on the relationship between environmental regulation and green R&D, in particular the extremely influential Porter hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Indrani Roy Chowdhury & Sandwip K. Das, 2011. "Environmental regulation, green R&D and the Porter hypothesis," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 142-152, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:igdrpp:v:4:y:2011:i:2:p:142-152
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stefan Ambec & Mark A. Cohen & Stewart Elgie & Paul Lanoie, 2013. "The Porter Hypothesis at 20: Can Environmental Regulation Enhance Innovation and Competitiveness?," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(1), pages 2-22, January.
    2. Indrani Roy chowdhury, 2009. "Incentives for Green R&D in a Dirty Industry under Price Competition," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(3), pages 2265-2274.
    3. Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2005. "Can Environmental Regulations be Good for Business? an Assessment of the Porter Hypothesis," Cahiers de recherche 0505, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    4. Eli Berman & Linda T. M. Bui, 2001. "Environmental Regulation And Productivity: Evidence From Oil Refineries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 498-510, August.
    5. Adam B. Jaffe et al., 1995. "Environmental Regulation and the Competitiveness of U.S. Manufacturing: What Does the Evidence Tell Us?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 132-163, March.
    6. Xepapadeas, Anastasios & de Zeeuw, Aart, 1999. "Environmental Policy and Competitiveness: The Porter Hypothesis and the Composition of Capital," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 165-182, March.
    7. Adam B. Jaffe & Karen Palmer, 1997. "Environmental Regulation And Innovation: A Panel Data Study," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 610-619, November.
    8. Popp, David, 2006. "International innovation and diffusion of air pollution control technologies: the effects of NOX and SO2 regulation in the US, Japan, and Germany," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 46-71, January.
    9. Prabal Roy Chowdhury, 2011. "The Porter hypothesis and hyperbolic discounting," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 167-176.
    10. Simpson, R. David & Bradford, Robert III, 1996. "Taxing Variable Cost: Environmental Regulation as Industrial Policy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 282-300, May.
    11. Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2002. "A theoretical foundation of the Porter hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 355-360, May.
    12. Mohr, Robert D., 2002. "Technical Change, External Economies, and the Porter Hypothesis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 158-168, January.
    13. Tobey, James A, 1990. "The Effects of Domestic Environmental Policies on Patterns of World Trade: An Empirical Test," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(2), pages 191-209.
    14. Indrani Roy Chowdhury, 2008. "Joint Ventures, Pollution And Environmental Policy," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 97-121, January.
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