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Economics Professors' Favorite Economic Thinkers, Journals, and Blogs (along with Party and Policy Views)

Author

Listed:
  • William L. Davis
  • Bob G. Figgins
  • David Hedengren
  • Daniel B. Klein

Abstract

A sample of 299 U.S. economics professors, presumably random, responded to our survey which asked favorites in the following areas: Economic thinkers (pre-twentieth century, twentieth century now deceased, living age 60 or older, living under age 60), economics journals, and economics blogs. First-place positions as favorite economist in their respective categories are Adam Smith (by far), John Maynard Keynes followed closely by Milton Friedman, Gary Becker, and Paul Krugman. For journals, the leaders are American Economic Review and Journal of Economic Perspectives. For blogs, the leaders are Greg Mankiw followed closely by Marginal Revolution (Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok). The survey also asked party-voting and 17 policy-view questions, and we relate the political variables of respondents to their choice of favorites.

Suggested Citation

  • William L. Davis & Bob G. Figgins & David Hedengren & Daniel B. Klein, 2011. "Economics Professors' Favorite Economic Thinkers, Journals, and Blogs (along with Party and Policy Views)," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 8(2), pages 126-146, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ejw:journl:v:8:y:2011:i:2:p:126-146
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Therese C. Grijalva & Clifford Nowell, 2008. "A Guide to Graduate Study in Economics: Ranking Economics Departments by Fields of Expertise," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(4), pages 971-996, April.
    2. David Hedengren & Daniel B. Klein & Carrie Milton, 2010. "Economist Petitions: Ideology Revealed," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 7(3), pages 288-319, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Blogging impact on authors
      by Inaki Villanueva in Applied economist on 2012-05-13 19:57:00
    2. Economists and the General Public bias
      by Inaki Villanueva in Applied economist on 2012-05-26 21:12:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dalton, John & Gaeto, Lillian, 2018. "Schumpeter vs. Keynes Redux: "Still Not Dead"," MPRA Paper 90543, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Daniel B. Klein & William L. Davis & David Hedengren, 2013. "Economics Professors' Voting, Policy Views, Favorite Economists, and Frequent Lack of Consensus," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(1), pages 116-125, January.
    3. David O. Cushman, 2012. "Mankiw vs. DeLong and Krugman on the CEA's Real GDP Forecasts in Early 2009: What Might a Time Series Econometrician Have Said?," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 9(3), pages 309-349, September.
    4. Ann Mari May & Mary G. Mcgarvey & Robert Whaples, 2014. "Are Disagreements Among Male And Female Economists Marginal At Best?: A Survey Of Aea Members And Their Views On Economics And Economic Policy," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 111-132, January.
    5. McKenzie, David & Ozler, Berk, 2011. "The impact of economics blogs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5783, The World Bank.
    6. Marcella Corsi & Carlo D'Ippoliti & Giulia Zacchia, 2017. "Gendered careers: women economists in Italy," Working Papers CEB 17-003, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. Daniel B. Klein, 2015. "Economists on the Welfare State and the Regulatory State: Why Don't Any Argue in Favor of One and Against the Other? A Symposium Prologue," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 12(1), pages 2-14, January.
    8. David McKenzie & Berk Özler, 2014. "Quantifying Some of the Impacts of Economics Blogs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(3), pages 567-597.
    9. Daniel B. Klein & William L. Davis & Bob G. Figgins & David Hedengren, 2012. "Characteristics of the Members of Twelve Economic Associations: Voting, Policy Views, and Favorite Economists," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 9(2), pages 149-162, May.
    10. Jordan Reel & Walter E. Block, 2013. "Educational Vouchers: Freedom to Choose?," Contemporary Economics, University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw., vol. 7(4), December.
    11. Richard A. Epstein, 2013. "Why There Is No Milton Friedman Today," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(2), pages 175-179, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economists; favorite economists; economics journals; economics blogs; party; voting; policy views; survey; Adam Smith;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B0 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General
    • B1 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925
    • B2 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925
    • B3 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals

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