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The impact of economics blogs

Author

Listed:
  • McKenzie, David
  • Ozler, Berk

Abstract

There is a proliferation of economics blogs, with increasing numbers of economists attracting large numbers of readers, yet little is known about the impact of this new medium. Using a variety of experimental and non-experimental techniques, this study quantifies some of their effects. First, links from blogs cause a striking increase in the number of abstract views and downloads of economics papers. Second, blogging raises the profile of the blogger (and his or her institution) and boosts their reputation above economists with similar publication records. Finally, a blog can transform attitudes about some of the topics it covers.

Suggested Citation

  • McKenzie, David & Ozler, Berk, 2011. "The impact of economics blogs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5783, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5783
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    2. Cass Sunstein, 2008. "Neither Hayek nor Habermas," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 87-95, January.
    3. Arai, Mahmood & Skogman Thoursie, Peter, 2006. "Giving up Foreign Names: An Empirical Examination of Surname Change and Earnings," Research Papers in Economics 2006:13, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    4. Craig E. Landry & Andreas Lange & John A. List & Michael K. Price & Nicholas G. Rupp, 2006. "Toward an Understanding of the Economics of Charity: Evidence from a Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 747-782.
    5. Stefano DellaVigna & Ethan Kaplan, 2007. "The Fox News Effect: Media Bias and Voting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1187-1234.
    6. James Rockey, 2009. "Who is left-wing, and who just thinks they are?," Discussion Papers in Economics 09/23, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    7. Irwin, Douglas A., 1998. "Higher Tariffs, Lower Revenues? Analyzing the Fiscal Aspects of “The Great Tariff Debate of 1888”," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(01), pages 59-72, March.
    8. Miriam Bruhn & David McKenzie, 2009. "In Pursuit of Balance: Randomization in Practice in Development Field Experiments," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(4), pages 200-232, October.
    9. William L. Davis & Bob G. Figgins & David Hedengren & Daniel B. Klein, 2011. "Economics Professors' Favorite Economic Thinkers, Journals, and Blogs (along with Party and Policy Views)," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 8(2), pages 126-146, May.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Blogging impact on academic papers
      by Inaki Villanueva in Applied economist on 2012-03-01 20:15:00
    2. Quantifying Some of the Impacts of Economics Blogs
      by UDADISI in UDADISI on 2014-04-03 03:28:00
    3. Reflections on our job market series
      by ? in Development Impact on 2011-12-22 15:11:22
    4. 31. Blogs of Economists: international lists by language
      by MCG Blogs de Economía in Euro-American Association: World Development on 2018-03-17 20:16:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Kässi, Otto & Westling, Tatu, 2011. "Economics of Smash-Hit Papers: Spillover Evidence from the 'Male Organ Incident'," MPRA Paper 33173, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tertiary Education; E-Business; Economic Theory&Research; Information Security&Privacy; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A23 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Graduate

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