IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Employment Impact of Product and Process Innovations in Turkey

  • Yesim Ucdogruk

    ()

Registered author(s):

    The intuition that technological progress was a key determinant of sustained economic growth provided the impetus of a large body of empirical literature that focused on understanding the employment consequences of innovation within and between firms, industries and countries. The aim of this study is to find an answer to classical question “Does technology creates or destroys jobs?” and evaluate the potential differences in the impact of product and process innovations in terms of employment generation in Turkish manufacturing industries over the periods 1995-1997 and 1998-2000. Our analysis states that the employment growth rates of both product and process innovators are positive especially in low technology industries.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.onlinedergi.com/MakaleDosyalari/51/PDF2006_1_9.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.onlinedergi.com/eab/arsiv/arsivDetay.aspx?yil=2006&peryot=1
    File Function: Website of the journal issue
    Download Restriction: no

    Article provided by Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences in its journal Ege Academic Review.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 87-99

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:ege:journl:v:6:y:2006:i:1:p:87-99
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://iibf.ege.edu.tr/ENG/

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Mariacristina Piva & Marco Vivarelli, 2004. "Technological change and employment: some micro evidence from Italy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(6), pages 373-376.
    2. Dunne, Timothy & Haltiwanger, John & Troske, Kenneth R., 1997. "Technology and jobs: secular changes and cyclical dynamics," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 107-178, June.
    3. Machin, S. & Van Reenen, J., 1997. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from Seven OECD Countries," Papers 24, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
    4. E. Berman & J. Bound & S. Machin, 1997. "Implications of skill-biased technological change: international evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20314, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Bauer, Thomas K. & Bender, Stefan, 2002. "Technological Change, Organizational Change, and Job Turnover," IZA Discussion Papers 570, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Van Reenen, John, 1997. "Employment and Technological Innovation: Evidence from U.K. Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 255-84, April.
    7. Sanders Mark & Weel Bas ter, 2000. "Skill-Biased Technical Change: Theoretical Concepts, Empirical Problems and a Survey of the Evidence," Research Memorandum 012, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    8. David Blanchflower & Simon Burgess, 1998. "New Technology And Jobs: Comparative Evidence From A Two Country Study," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2-4), pages 109-138.
    9. Falk, Martin & Seim, Katja, 1999. "The impact of information technology on high-skilled labour in services: evidence from firm level panel data," ZEW Discussion Papers 99-58, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    10. Eric Maurin & David Thesmar, 2004. "Changes in the Functional Structure of Firms and the Demand for Skill," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(3), pages 639-664, July.
    11. Tommaso Antonucci & Mario Pianta, 2002. "Employment Effects of Product and Process Innovation in Europe," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 295-307.
    12. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
    13. Peters, Bettina, 2004. "Employment Effects of Different Innovation Activities: Microeconometric Evidence," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-73, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    14. Haskel, Jonathan & Heden, Ylva, 1999. "Computers and the Demand for Skilled Labour: Industry- and Establishment-Level Panel Evidence for the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages C68-79, March.
    15. John T . Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2001. "Technology, Employment and Wages," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 15(2), pages 191-219, 06.
    16. Surendra Gera & Wulong Gu & Zhengxi Lin, 2001. "Technology and the demand for skills in Canada: an industry-level analysis," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 132-148, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ege:journl:v:6:y:2006:i:1:p:87-99. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Baris Gök)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.