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Rural Women's Access to Credit: Market Imperfections and Intrahousehold Dynamics

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  • Fletschner, Diana

Abstract

Summary Credit rationing studies carried out at the household level and based on responses from male heads of households present an incomplete and biased assessment of who is likely to be constrained, why they are constrained, and what is the extent of the constraints. They ignore possibly conflictive intrahousehold dynamics and assume that imperfections in rural financial markets are gender-neutral. This paper addresses both issues theoretically and empirically. The Semi-Cooperative Household model developed for this analysis formalizes the conditions under which spouses', and particularly women's, individual access to credit can be affected by their own position in the financial market as well as by intrahousehold dynamics. These notions are then explored empirically using husbands' and wives' individual perceptions of their access to credit in rural Paraguay. The most significant empirical findings of the paper are that (i) compared to men, women are more likely to be credit constrained; (ii) women's rationing status responds to a different set of factors than men's; and (iii) husbands may choose not to intermediate capital to their wives even when they are able to do so. Results from this exercise provide empirically sound support for the assumptions underlying women-targeted credit programs.

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  • Fletschner, Diana, 2009. "Rural Women's Access to Credit: Market Imperfections and Intrahousehold Dynamics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 618-631, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:3:p:618-631
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    Cited by:

    1. Agier, Isabelle & Szafarz, Ariane, 2013. "Microfinance and Gender: Is There a Glass Ceiling on Loan Size?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 165-181.
    2. Labie, Marc & Méon, Pierre-Guillaume & Mersland, Roy & Szafarz, Ariane, 2015. "Discrimination by microcredit officers: Theory and evidence on disability in Uganda," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 44-55.
    3. Valentina Hartarska & Denis Nadolnyak & Roy Mersland, 2014. "Are Women Better Bankers to the Poor? Evidence from Rural Microfinance Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1291-1306.
    4. Anastasia Cozarenco & Ariane Szafarz, 2013. "Female Access to Credit in France: How Microfinance Institutions Import Disparate Treatment from Banks," Working Papers halshs-00874448, HAL.
    5. Claudia Piras & Andrea Filippo Presbitero & Roberta Rabellotti, 2013. "Definitions Matter: Measuring Gender Gaps in Firms' Access to Credit," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 90, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    6. repec:spr:elcore:v:17:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10660-016-9247-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Díaz Serrano, Lluís & Sackey, Frank G., 2016. "Empowering the vulnerable to be entrepreneurs: An empirical test on the efectiveness of the Ghana microfinance policy 2006," Working Papers 2072/267084, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    8. Aggarwal, Raj & Goodell, John W. & Selleck, Lauren J., 2015. "Lending to women in microfinance: Role of social trust," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 55-65.
    9. Périlleux, Anaïs & Szafarz, Ariane, 2015. "Women Leaders and Social Performance: Evidence from Financial Cooperatives in Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 437-452.
    10. Malapit, Hazel Jean L., 2012. "Why do spouses hide income?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 584-593.
    11. Anaïs PERILLEUX & Ariane SZAFARZ, 2014. "Female Managers in Hybrid Organizations: Evidence from Financial Cooperatives in Senegal," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2014018, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    12. Djossou, Gbètoton Nadège Adèle & Monwanou, Djohodo Ines & Novignon, Jacob, 2016. "Improving access to microcredit in Benin: are the poor and women benefiting?," MPRA Paper 72219, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Ghosh, Saibal & Vinod, D., 2017. "What Constrains Financial Inclusion for Women? Evidence from Indian Micro data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 60-81.
    14. Sarpong, Sam, 2016. "Building local institutional capacity to improve food security: using the SATISFY approach," MPRA Paper 69927, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Périlleux, Anaïs & Szafarz, Ariane, 2015. "Women Leaders and Social Performance: Evidence from Financial Cooperatives in Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 437-452.
    16. Anastasia Cozarenco & Ariane Szafarz, 2013. "Women’s Access to Credit in France: How Microfinance Institutions Import Disparate Treatment from Banks," Working Papers CEB 13-037, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    17. Fletschner, Diana & Mesbah, Dina, 2011. "Gender Disparity in Access to Information: Do Spouses Share What They Know?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1422-1433, August.
    18. Lobna M. Abdellatif & Mohamed Ramadan & Sarah A. Elbakry, 2017. "How Gender Biased Are Female-Headed Household Transfers in Egypt?," Working Papers 1126, Economic Research Forum, revised 08 Oct 2017.
    19. Bailey, Rachel & Hartarska, Valentina, 2017. "Women's Property Rights and Outreach of Microfinance Institutions Targeting Women," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 253159, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    20. Dongyu Chen & Xiaolin Li & Fujun Lai, 0. "Gender discrimination in online peer-to-peer credit lending: evidence from a lending platform in China," Electronic Commerce Research, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-31.

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