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Determinants of credit rationing

  • Zeller, Manfred

Previous research on the determinants of credit rationing exclusively focused on the behavior of formal lenders who contract directly with an individual borrower. Based on a household survey in Madagascar, this paper presents an analysis of credit rationing behavior by informal lenders and by members of community-based groups that allocate formal group loans among themselves. The results show that group members obtain and use locally available information about the applicant's creditworthiness in much the same way that informal lenders do. This paper therefore empirically confirms theoretical arguments made that community-based groups have an information advantage over distant formal bank agents.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series FCND discussion papers with number 2.

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Date of creation: 1994
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:2
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  1. Yadav, S. & Otsuka, K. & David, C. C., 1992. "Segmentation in rural financial markets: the case of Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 423-436, March.
  2. Alderman, H. & Paxson, C.H., 1992. "Do the Poor Insure? A Synthesis of the Literature on Risk and Consumption in Developing Countries," Papers 164, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
  3. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  4. Huppi, Monika & Feder, Gershon, 1989. "The role of groups and credit cooperatives in rural lending," Policy Research Working Paper Series 284, The World Bank.
  5. Jappelli, Tullio, 1990. "Who Is Credit Constrained in the U.S. Economy?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(1), pages 219-34, February.
  6. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Credit for alleviation of rural poverty: the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh," Research reports 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Yaron, J., 1992. "Successful Rural Finance Institutions," World Bank - Discussion Papers 150, World Bank.
  8. Bhatt, V. V., 1988. "On financial innovations and credit market evolution," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 281-292, February.
  9. Feder, Gershon & Lau, Lawrence J. & Lin, Justin Y. & Xiaopeng Luo, 1991. "Credit's effect on productivity in Chinese agriculture : a microeconomic model of disequilibrium," Policy Research Working Paper Series 571, The World Bank.
  10. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1990. "Peer Monitoring and Credit Markets," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 4(3), pages 351-66, September.
  11. Coate, Stephen & Ravallion, Martin, 1993. "Reciprocity without commitment : Characterization and performance of informal insurance arrangements," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-24, February.
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