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Network design, built and natural environments, and bicycle commuting: Evidence from British cities and towns

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  • Cervero, Robert
  • Denman, Steve
  • Jin, Ying

Abstract

Rates of cycling to work vary significantly from one urban area to another but the reasons for these variations are not well understood. Existing literature highlights the importance of built environments, urban amenities, and high-quality bicycle networks in promoting cycling. However, few studies measure the respective contributions and weigh the collective magnitude of effects of these influences together. We present a multivariate model that reflects the influences of such factors for 36 cities and towns in Britain. The models reveal a complex web of forces shaping cycling to work, confirming that there is no single, silver-bullet factor even in cities with remarkably high commuter cycling. The model results highlight the importance in joining up network level interventions, for instance to reduce both route circuity and on-road stress, which are objectives often being pursued separately. The results also highlight the importance of non-transport aspects such as land use mix and landscape amenities along commuter routes, and the role of city-specific cycling culture. They also underscore the need for closer collaboration between promoters of commuter cycling and wider urban disciplines to create low-stress routes and supportive built environments in cities and their outskirts.

Suggested Citation

  • Cervero, Robert & Denman, Steve & Jin, Ying, 2019. "Network design, built and natural environments, and bicycle commuting: Evidence from British cities and towns," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 153-164.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:74:y:2019:i:c:p:153-164
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2018.09.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Shahram Heydari & Garyfallos Konstantinoudis & Abdul Wahid Behsoodi, 2021. "Effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on bike-sharing demand and hire time: Evidence from Santander Cycles in London," Papers 2107.11589, arXiv.org.
    4. Kathrin Goldmann & Jan Wessel, 2020. "Some People Feel the Rain, Others Just Get Wet: An Analysis of Regional Differences in the Effects of Weather on Cycling," Working Papers 33, Institute of Transport Economics, University of Muenster.
    5. Bean, Richard & Pojani, Dorina & Corcoran, Jonathan, 2021. "How does weather affect bikeshare use? A comparative analysis of forty cities across climate zones," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 95(C).
    6. Wang, Kailai & Akar, Gulsah & Lee, Kevin & Sanders, Meredyth, 2020. "Commuting patterns and bicycle level of traffic stress (LTS): Insights from spatially aggregated data in Franklin County, Ohio," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    7. Qiyao Yang & Jun Cai & Tao Feng & Zhengying Liu & Harry Timmermans, 2021. "Bikeway Provision and Bicycle Commuting: City-Level Empirical Findings from the US," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(6), pages 1-15, March.
    8. Agnieszka Jaszczak & Agnieszka Morawiak & Joanna Żukowska, 2020. "Cycling as a Sustainable Transport Alternative in Polish Cittaslow Towns," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(12), pages 1-23, June.
    9. An, Ran & Zahnow, Renee & Pojani, Dorina & Corcoran, Jonathan, 2019. "Weather and cycling in New York: The case of Citibike," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 97-112.
    10. Khashayar Kazemzadeh & Aliaksei Laureshyn & Lena Winslott Hiselius & Enrico Ronchi, 2020. "Expanding the Scope of the Bicycle Level-of-Service Concept: A Review of the Literature," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(7), pages 1-30, April.
    11. Nello-Deakin, Samuel, 2020. "Environmental determinants of cycling: Not seeing the forest for the trees?," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
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    13. Demetrio Carmine Festa & Carmen Forciniti, 2019. "Attitude towards Bike Use in Rende, a Small Town in South Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-15, May.

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