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The effect of weather and climate on bicycle commuting

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  • Nankervis, Max

Abstract

This study presents data on the effect of both (short-term) weather conditions and (long-term) seasonal variation patterns on bicycle commuting patterns among several groups of tertiary students in the temperate climate of Melbourne, Australia. It questions some assumptions which have suggested that certain conditions are perceived by riders to make commuter cycling non-viable, and thus lead to a significant drop in numbers on days or periods when these conditions persist. While the data indicate that the assumptions have a foundation, the effects on the group surveyed are not as powerful as assumed. However, as students are an atypical group in several significant aspects, the results should only be transferred to non-student groups with some caution.

Suggested Citation

  • Nankervis, Max, 1999. "The effect of weather and climate on bicycle commuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 417-431, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:33:y:1999:i:6:p:417-431
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    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel Damant-Sirois & Michael Grimsrud & Ahmed El-Geneidy, 2014. "What’s your type: a multidimensional cyclist typology," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1153-1169, November.
    2. Downward, Paul & Rasciute, Simona, 2015. "Assessing the impact of the National Cycle Network and physical activity lifestyle on cycling behaviour in England," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 425-437.
    3. Lanzendorf, Martin & Busch-Geertsema, Annika, 2014. "The cycling boom in large German cities—Empirical evidence for successful cycling campaigns," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 26-33.
    4. Ma, Wanjing & Li, Li & Wang, Yinhai, 2016. "A driving force model for non-strict priority crossing behaviors of right-turn driversAuthor-Name: Lin, Dianchao," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 230-244.
    5. Vandenbulcke, Grégory & Dujardin, Claire & Thomas, Isabelle & Geus, Bas de & Degraeuwe, Bart & Meeusen, Romain & Panis, Luc Int, 2011. "Cycle commuting in Belgium: Spatial determinants and 're-cycling' strategies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 118-137, February.
    6. Pucher, John & Buehler, Ralph & Seinen, Mark, 2011. "Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 451-475, July.
    7. Cheng, Yung-Hsiang & Liu, Kuo-Chu, 2012. "Evaluating bicycle-transit users’ perceptions of intermodal inconvenience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1690-1706.
    8. Verma, Meghna & Rahul, T.M. & Reddy, Peesari Vamshidhar & Verma, Ashish, 2016. "The factors influencing bicycling in the Bangalore city," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 29-40.
    9. Álvaro Fernández-Heredia & Sergio Jara-Díaz & Andrés Monzón, 2016. "Modelling bicycle use intention: the role of perceptions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 1-23, January.
    10. Wooliscroft, Ben & Ganglmair-Wooliscroft, Alexandra, 2014. "Improving conditions for potential New Zealand cyclists: An application of conjoint analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 11-19.
    11. Álvaro Fernández-Heredia & Sergio Jara-Díaz & Andrés Monzón, 2016. "Modelling bicycle use intention: the role of perceptions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 1-23, January.
    12. Strauss, Jillian & Miranda-Moreno, Luis F., 2013. "Spatial modeling of bicycle activity at signalized intersections," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 6(2), pages 47-58.
    13. Hyungkyoo Kim & Elizabeth Macdonald, 2016. "Does Wind Discourage Sustainable Transportation Mode Choice? Findings from San Francisco, California, USA," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-15, March.
    14. Delmelle, Eric M. & Delmelle, Elizabeth Cahill, 2012. "Exploring spatio-temporal commuting patterns in a university environment," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 1-9.
    15. Smith, Michael S. & Kauermann, Göran, 2011. "Bicycle commuting in Melbourne during the 2000s energy crisis: A semiparametric analysis of intraday volumes," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1846-1862.
    16. Eva Heinen & Kees Maat & Bert Wee, 2013. "The effect of work-related factors on the bicycle commute mode choice in the Netherlands," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 23-43, January.
    17. Kyle Gebhart & Robert Noland, 2014. "The impact of weather conditions on bikeshare trips in Washington, DC," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1205-1225, November.
    18. Damant-Sirois, Gabriel & El-Geneidy, Ahmed M., 2015. "Who cycles more? Determining cycling frequency through a segmentation approach in Montreal, Canada," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 113-125.
    19. Ralph Buehler & John Pucher, 2012. "Cycling to work in 90 large American cities: new evidence on the role of bike paths and lanes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 409-432, March.
    20. Ruiz, Tomás & Bernabé, José C., 2014. "Measuring factors influencing valuation of nonmotorized improvement measures," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 195-211.
    21. repec:eee:transa:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:154-166 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Broadstock, David C. & Collins, Alan, 2010. "Measuring unobserved prices using the structural time-series model: The case of cycling," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 195-200, May.

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