IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/trapol/v6y1999i1p57-73.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Ten myths about US urban rail systems

Author

Listed:
  • Rubin, Thomas A.
  • Moore II, James E.
  • Lee, Shin

Abstract

The proponents of rail transit have promulgated a set of stock arguments to help convince officials and the electorate that rail transit is a necessary component of a contemporary urban transportation system. These myths have gradually bored their way into conventional wisdom. We examine and dispel the following rail myths: (1) rail is cost-effective, (2) rail is the people's choice, (3) rail is fast transit, (4) rail is high capacity transit, (5) rail construction provides jobs, (6) rail promotes superior urban form, (7) rail will be paid for with non-local funds that cannot be used for other purposes, (8) rail will attract new riders to transit, (9) rail will decongest roads, and (10) there are no alternatives to rail.

Suggested Citation

  • Rubin, Thomas A. & Moore II, James E. & Lee, Shin, 1999. "Ten myths about US urban rail systems," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 57-73, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:6:y:1999:i:1:p:57-73
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967-070X(98)00032-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. P Gordon & H W Richardson & H L Wong, 1986. "The Distribution of Population and Employment in a Polycentric City: The Case of Los Angeles," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 18(2), pages 161-173, February.
    2. N/A, 1972. "Summary," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 59(1), pages 3-3, February.
    3. P Gordon & H W Richardson & H L Wong, 1986. "The distribution of population and employment in a polycentric city: the case of Los Angeles," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 18(2), pages 161-173, February.
    4. N/A, 1972. "Summary," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 60(1), pages 3-3, May.
    5. Boarnet, Marlon G. & Crane, Randall, 1995. "Public Finance and Transit-Oriented Planning: New Evidence from Southern California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4v95x0tm, University of California Transportation Center.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bradley Lane, 2011. "TAZ-level variation in work trip mode choice between 1990 and 2000 and the presence of rail transit," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 147-171, June.
    2. Harry W. Richardson & Peter Gordon, 2000. "Compactness or Sprawl: America's Future vs. the Present," Working Paper 8645, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    3. Cao, Xinyu (Jason) & Porter-Nelson, Dean, 2016. "Real estate development in anticipation of the Green Line light rail transit in St. Paul," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 24-32.
    4. repec:eee:jeeman:v:87:y:2018:i:c:p:72-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lane, Bradley W., 2008. "Significant characteristics of the urban rail renaissance in the United States: A discriminant analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 279-295, February.
    6. Brinkman, P. Anthony, 2003. "The Ethical Challenges and Professional Responses of Travel Demand Forecasters," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7vb2d17h, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Brian Taylor & Eric Morris, 2015. "Public transportation objectives and rider demographics: are transit’s priorities poor public policy?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 347-367, March.
    8. Cao, Xinyu (Jason) & Schoner, Jessica, 2014. "The influence of light rail transit on transit use: An exploration of station area residents along the Hiawatha line in Minneapolis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 134-143.
    9. Beaudoin, Justin & Farzin, Y. Hossein & Lin Lawell, C.-Y. Cynthia, 2015. "Public transit investment and sustainable transportation: A review of studies of transit's impact on traffic congestion and air quality," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 15-22.
    10. Brinkman, P. Anthony, 2003. "The Ethical Challenges and Professional Responses of Travel Demand Forecasters," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6dv0z95g, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. Stanger, R., 2000. "Ten myths about US urban rail systems by Thomas Rubin, James Moore, and Shin Lee--a rejoinder," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 303-305, October.
    12. Brinkman, Anthony P., 2003. "The Ethical Challenges and Professional Responses of Travel Demand Forecasters," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt9c3330tt, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    13. Werner, Carol M. & Brown, Barbara B. & Tribby, Calvin P. & Tharp, Doug & Flick, Kristi & Miller, Harvey J. & Smith, Ken R. & Jensen, Wyatt, 2016. "Evaluating the attractiveness of a new light rail extension: Testing simple change and displacement change hypotheses," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 15-23.
    14. De Bruijn, Hans & Veeneman, Wijnand, 2009. "Decision-making for light rail," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 349-359, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:6:y:1999:i:1:p:57-73. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/30473/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.