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Modeling politicians' preferences for road pricing policies: A regret-based and utilitarian perspective

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  • Chorus, Caspar G.
  • Annema, Jan Anne
  • Mouter, Niek
  • van Wee, Bert

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a stated choice-study among Dutch local politicians in the context of road pricing policies. Politicians were asked to express their preferences for policy-options that differed in terms of (i) emissions reduction, (ii) congestion reduction, (iii) operational costs, (iv) acceptability among the general public and (v) acceptability among retailers. Utility-maximization-based and regret-minimization-based discrete choice models were estimated, and their results compared, on 238 stated choices made by members of Dutch city-councils. The estimated models allow for the evaluation of the popularity of different road pricing scenarios among Dutch local politicians, as a function of their performance in terms of the above-mentioned criteria.

Suggested Citation

  • Chorus, Caspar G. & Annema, Jan Anne & Mouter, Niek & van Wee, Bert, 2011. "Modeling politicians' preferences for road pricing policies: A regret-based and utilitarian perspective," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 856-861, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:6:p:856-861
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. van Cranenburgh, Sander & Prato, Carlo G., 2016. "On the robustness of random regret minimization modelling outcomes towards omitted attributes," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 51-70.
    2. Boeri, Marco & Scarpa, Riccardo & Chorus, Caspar G., 2014. "Stated choices and benefit estimates in the context of traffic calming schemes: Utility maximization, regret minimization, or both?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 121-135.
    3. repec:eee:transa:v:105:y:2017:i:c:p:79-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Boeri, Marco & Longo, Alberto & Grisolía, José M. & Hutchinson, W. George & Kee, Frank, 2013. "The role of regret minimisation in lifestyle choices affecting the risk of coronary heart disease," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 253-260.
    5. Chorus, Caspar G., 2012. "Logsums for utility-maximizers and regret-minimizers, and their relation with desirability and satisfaction," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(7), pages 1003-1012.
    6. Longo, Alberto & Boeri, Marco, 2014. "Information, Random Regret Minimisation, Random Utility Maximisation: Willingness to pay for Renewable Energy," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182670, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. van Cranenburgh, Sander & Guevara, Cristian Angelo & Chorus, Caspar G., 2015. "New insights on random regret minimization models," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 91-109.
    8. Chorus, Caspar & van Cranenburgh, Sander & Dekker, Thijs, 2014. "Random regret minimization for consumer choice modeling: Assessment of empirical evidence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 2428-2436.

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