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Kids and cars: Environmental attitudes in children


  • Kopnina, Helen


This article aims to supplement scarce research on the children's attitudes to cars and the environment. Assuming that attitudes to cars develop in childhood, this article draws upon the writing assignments and interviews exploring the upper-elementary school children's attitudes to cars. The study was conducted in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, between January and December 2010. Briefly examining existing research on children's environmental attitudes in general, and in relation to cars in particular, the author argues that in-depth qualitative research is essential to the understanding of the factors that explain present attitudes and perhaps predicting the behavior of the future users of the means of transportation. In conclusion, the author makes a recommendation for the development of a curriculum addressing the development of children's awareness of sustainable transportation.

Suggested Citation

  • Kopnina, Helen, 2011. "Kids and cars: Environmental attitudes in children," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 573-578, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:4:p:573-578

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hickman, Robin & Ashiru, Olu & Banister, David, 2010. "Transport and climate change: Simulating the options for carbon reduction in London," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 110-125, March.
    2. Tertoolen, Gerard & van Kreveld, Dik & Verstraten, Ben, 1998. "Psychological resistance against attempts to reduce private car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 171-181, April.
    3. A. Greening, Lorna & Greene, David L. & Difiglio, Carmen, 2000. "Energy efficiency and consumption -- the rebound effect -- a survey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(6-7), pages 389-401, June.
    4. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part II: Policy instruments for sustainable road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, pages 46-91.
    5. Hickman, Robin & Banister, David, 2007. "Looking over the horizon: Transport and reduced CO2 emissions in the UK by 2030," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 377-387, September.
    6. Steg, Linda, 2005. "Car use: lust and must. Instrumental, symbolic and affective motives for car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 147-162.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kopnina, Helen & Williams, Melanie, 2012. "Car attitudes in children from different socio-economic backgrounds in the Netherlands," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 118-125.
    2. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:209-220 is not listed on IDEAS


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