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The role of instrumental, hedonic and symbolic attributes in the intention to adopt electric vehicles

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  • Schuitema, Geertje
  • Anable, Jillian
  • Skippon, Stephen
  • Kinnear, Neale

Abstract

The aim is to understand how private car drivers’ perception of vehicle attributes may affect their intention to adopt electric vehicles (EVs). Data are obtained from a national online survey of potential EV adopters in the UK. The results indicate that instrumental attributes are important largely because they are associated with other attributes derived from owning and using EVs, including pleasure of driving (hedonic attributes) and identity derived from owning and using EVs (symbolic attributes). People who believe that a pro-environmental self-identity fits with their self-image are more likely to have positive perceptions of EV attributes. Perceptions of EV attributes are only very weakly associated with car-authority identity.

Suggested Citation

  • Schuitema, Geertje & Anable, Jillian & Skippon, Stephen & Kinnear, Neale, 2013. "The role of instrumental, hedonic and symbolic attributes in the intention to adopt electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 39-49.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:48:y:2013:i:c:p:39-49
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2012.10.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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