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What Sustainable Road Transport Future?: Trends and Policy Options

Author

Listed:
  • Stef Proost

    (Catholic University of Leuven)

  • Kurt van Dender

    (OECD)

Abstract

A brief review of long run projections of demand for road transport suggests that problems related to road network congestion and greenhouse gas emissions are likely to become more pressing than they are now. Hence we review, from a macroscopic perspective, popular policy measures to address these problems: stimulating modal shift, regulating land use to reduce car use, and boosting low carbon technology adoption to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We find that these policies can produce tangible results, but that they may have unintended consequences that drive up costs considerably.

Suggested Citation

  • Stef Proost & Kurt van Dender, 2010. "What Sustainable Road Transport Future?: Trends and Policy Options," OECD/ITF Joint Transport Research Centre Discussion Papers 2010/14, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:itfaaa:2010/14-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5km4q8jnn7q4-en
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    Cited by:

    1. Nikolaos Thomopoulos & Susan Grant-Muller, 2013. "Incorporating equity as part of the wider impacts in transport infrastructure assessment: an application of the SUMINI approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 315-345, February.
    2. Schuitema, Geertje & Anable, Jillian & Skippon, Stephen & Kinnear, Neale, 2013. "The role of instrumental, hedonic and symbolic attributes in the intention to adopt electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 39-49.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:662-:d:134182 is not listed on IDEAS

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