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Towards a practical method to establish comparable values of travel time savings from stated choice experiments with differing design dimensions

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  • Hensher, David A.

Abstract

Individual's process the information in stated choice (SC) experiments in many different ways. In order to accommodate decisions rules that are used in processing information, there is good sense in conditioning the parameterisation of stated choice design attributes on these rules. In particular, rules might be invoked to cope with the dimensionality of the SC design. In this paper, we investigate the impact of rules such as attribute aggregation and reference dependency on preference profiles for specific design attributes, as well as the design specification, as we vary the dimensionality of an SC design. The heteroscedastic extreme value logit model is estimated to identify the role of design dimensionality and attribute processing rules, after accounting for scale differences across sixteen pooled data designs The empirical evidence, drawn from a study in Sydney of car commuter route choice, suggests that accounting for the way that stated choice designs are processed, given their dimensionality, does make a statistically significant difference on measures of willingness to pay, as does accounting for scale differences between pooled data designs. This evidence has practical value in guiding the design of SC experiments and in adjusting results from different SC designs when comparing the evidence. We propose a simple adjustment formula to use in adjusting VTTS from different studies so that they are comparable. From a practical policy perspective, the evidence sends a warning about the risk of undervaluing mean VTTS if the attribute processing rules are not accounted for.

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  • Hensher, David A., 2006. "Towards a practical method to establish comparable values of travel time savings from stated choice experiments with differing design dimensions," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 829-840, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:40:y:2006:i:10:p:829-840
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    Cited by:

    1. Börjesson, Maria & Fosgerau, Mogens & Algers, Staffan, 2012. "Catching the tail: Empirical identification of the distribution of the value of travel time," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 378-391.
    2. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Maconi, Laura & Shirvani, Tara & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part I: Externalities and economic policies in road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 2-45.
    3. Palhazi Cuervo, Daniel & Kessels, Roselinde & Goos, Peter & Sörensen, Kenneth, 2016. "An integrated algorithm for the optimal design of stated choice experiments with partial profiles," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 93(PA), pages 648-669.
    4. repec:eee:transb:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:83-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:touman:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:105-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Tillema, Taede & van Wee, Bert & Ettema, Dick, 2010. "The influence of (toll-related) travel costs in residential location decisions of households: A stated choice approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 785-796, December.
    7. Bliemer, Michiel C.J. & Rose, John M., 2011. "Experimental design influences on stated choice outputs: An empirical study in air travel choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 63-79, January.
    8. Börjesson, Maria & Eliasson, Jonas, 2014. "Experiences from the Swedish Value of Time study," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 144-158.
    9. Mouter, Niek & Annema, Jan Anne & van Wee, Bert, 2013. "Ranking the substantive problems in the Dutch Cost–Benefit Analysis practice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 241-255.
    10. Cascetta, Ennio & Cartenì, Armando & Pagliara, Francesca & Montanino, Marcello, 2015. "A new look at planning and designing transportation systems: A decision-making model based on cognitive rationality, stakeholder engagement and quantitative methods," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 27-39.

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