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Analyzing the impact of sport infrastructure on sport participation using geo-coded data: Evidence from multi-level models

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  • Wicker, Pamela
  • Hallmann, Kirstin
  • Breuer, Christoph

Abstract

Sport policies aiming at increasing mass participation and club participation have stressed the importance of sport infrastructure. Previous research has mainly analyzed the influence of individual factors (age, income, etc.) on sport participation. Although a few studies have dealt with the impact of sport facilities on sport participation, some methodological shortcomings can be observed regarding the integration of sport infrastructure into the research design. Oftentimes, subjective measures of infrastructure are employed, leading to biased results, for example inactive people have a worse perception of the actual supply of facilities. In fact it is important to measure the available sport infrastructure objectively using a quantitative approach and integrate it into statistical models. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of individual and infrastructure variables on sport participation in general and in sport clubs using geo-coded data following a multi-level design. For this purpose, both primary data (individual level) and secondary data (infrastructure level) were collected in the city of Munich, Germany. A telephone survey of the resident population was carried out (n=11,175) and secondary data on the available sport infrastructure in Munich were collected. Both datasets were geo-coded using Gauss–Krueger coordinates and integrated into multi-level analyses. The multi-level models show that swimming pools are of particular importance for sport participation in general and sport fields for participation in sport clubs. Challenges and implications for a more holistic modeling of sport participation including infrastructure variables are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Wicker, Pamela & Hallmann, Kirstin & Breuer, Christoph, 2013. "Analyzing the impact of sport infrastructure on sport participation using geo-coded data: Evidence from multi-level models," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 54-67.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:spomar:v:16:y:2013:i:1:p:54-67
    DOI: 10.1016/j.smr.2012.05.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hallmann, Kirstin, 2015. "Modelling the decision to volunteer in organised sports," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 448-463.
    2. Vörös, Tünde, 2017. "Költség-haszon elemzési keretrendszer sportberuházások társadalmi-gazdasági értékeléséhez
      [An economic framework for cost-benefit analysis of sports facilities]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(4), pages 394-420.
    3. Cabane Charlotte & Lechner Michael, 2015. "Physical Activity of Adults: A Survey of Correlates, Determinants, and Effects," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 376-402, August.
    4. Wicker, Pamela & Breuer, Christoph, 2014. "Exploring the organizational capacity and organizational problems of disability sport clubs in Germany using matched pairs analysis," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 23-34.
    5. Jane E. Ruseski & Katerina Maresova, 2014. "Economic Freedom, Sport Policy, And Individual Participation In Physical Activity: An International Comparison," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 42-55, January.
    6. O’Reilly, Norm & Berger, Ida E. & Hernandez, Tony & Parent, Milena M. & Séguin, Benoit, 2015. "Urban sportscapes: An environmental deterministic perspective on the management of youth sport participation," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 291-307.
    7. Matt Andrews & Stuart Russell & Douglas Barrios, 2016. "Governance and the Challenge of Development Through Sports: A Framework for Action," CID Working Papers 323, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    8. Sotiriadou, Popi & Wicker, Pamela, 2014. "Examining the participation patterns of an ageing population with disabilities in Australia," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 35-48.

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