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Social Interactions And The Demand For Sport: An Economic Analysis




"This paper explores the decision to participate in sports activities in the United Kingdom and the subsequent frequency of participation. The paper draws links between economic and other theories of social interaction to motivate the discussion and links these theories to assessing policy initiatives in the United Kingdom. Cluster analysis is combined with a Heckman analysis to examine the empirical evidence provided by the General Household Survey in 2002. The results suggest that social and personal capital are of paramount importance in determining sports participation, and consequently, it is these features that policy should focus upon. However, the legitimacy of policy activism requires philosophical justification. "("JEL "B41, C2, D11, D12) Copyright 2007 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Downward & Joseph Riordan, 2007. "Social Interactions And The Demand For Sport: An Economic Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(4), pages 518-537, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:25:y:2007:i:4:p:518-537

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    2. Marc Lavoie, 1994. "A Post Keynesian Approach to Consumer Choice," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 539-562, July.
    3. Lisa Farrell & Michael A. Shields, 2002. "Investigating the economic and demographic determinants of sporting participation in England," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(2), pages 335-348.
    4. Becker, Gary S., 1992. "The Economic Way of Looking at Life," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 1992-1, Nobel Prize Committee.
    5. Joseph J. Seneca & Paul Davidson & F. Gerard Adams, 1968. "An Analysis of Recreational Use of the TVA Lakes," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4), pages 529-534.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Di Domizio & Raul Caruso, 2015. "Hooliganism and Demand for Football in Italy: Attendance and Counterviolence Policy Evaluation," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 16(2), pages 123-137, May.
    2. Muñiz, Cristina & Rodríguez, Plácido & Suárez, María J., 2014. "Sports and cultural habits by gender: An application using count data models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 288-297.
    3. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio, 2012. "Hooliganism and demand for football in Italy. Evidence for the period 1962-2011," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Politica Economica ispe0062, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    4. Hallmann, Kirstin, 2015. "Modelling the decision to volunteer in organised sports," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 448-463.
    5. Downward, Paul & Rasciute, Simona, 2015. "Assessing the impact of the National Cycle Network and physical activity lifestyle on cycling behaviour in England," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 425-437.
    6. Downward, Paul & Rasciute, Simona, 2016. "‘No man is an island entire of itself.’ The hidden effect of peers on physical activity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 149-156.
    7. Wicker, Pamela & Hallmann, Kirstin & Breuer, Christoph, 2013. "Analyzing the impact of sport infrastructure on sport participation using geo-coded data: Evidence from multi-level models," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 54-67.
    8. Eberth, Barbara & Smith, Murray D., 2010. "Modelling the participation decision and duration of sporting activity in Scotland," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 822-834, July.
    9. Paár, Dávid, 2013. "Differences In The Hungarian Households’ Sport Expenditures," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, vol. 7(1).
    10. Pawlowski, Tim & Schüttoff, Ute & Downward, Paul & Lechner, Michael, 2014. "Sport participation and Child Development in Less Developed Countries," Economics Working Paper Series 1433, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    11. Michael Lechner & Paul Downward, 2017. "Heterogeneous sports participation and labour market outcomes in England," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(4), pages 335-348, January.
    12. Cabane Charlotte & Lechner Michael, 2015. "Physical Activity of Adults: A Survey of Correlates, Determinants, and Effects," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 376-402, August.
    13. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio, 2013. "Allo Stadio Come Alla Guerra? Ostilità Internazionale E Aggressività Sul Campo Di Calcio," Rivista di Diritto ed Economia dello Sport, Centro di diritto e business dello Sport, vol. 9(2), pages 127-142, settembre.
    14. Caruso, Raul, 2011. "Crime and sport participation: Evidence from Italian regions over the period 1997–2003," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 455-463.
    15. Themis Kokolakakis & Fernando Lera Lopez & Thanos Panagouleas, 2011. "Analysis of the Determinants of Sports Participation in Spain and England. Statistical, Economic Analysis and Policy Conclusions," Post-Print hal-00710058, HAL.
    16. repec:eee:spomar:v:20:y:2017:i:5:p:455-467 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Sandrine Poupaux & Christoph Breuer, 2009. "Does higher sport supply lead to higher sport demand? A city level analysis," Working Papers 0905, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    18. Vasilios Kosteas, 2015. "Physical activity and time preference," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 361-386, December.
    19. Thibaut, Erik & Vos, Steven & Scheerder, Jeroen, 2014. "Hurdles for sports consumption? The determining factors of household sports expenditures," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 444-454.
    20. Downward, Paul & Lera-Lopez, Fernando & Rasciute, Simona, 2011. "The Zero-Inflated ordered probit approach to modelling sports participation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2469-2477.
    21. Hallmann, Kirstin & Breuer, Christoph & Kühnreich, Benedikt, 2013. "Happiness, pride and elite sporting success: What population segments gain most from national athletic achievements?," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 226-235.
    22. Paul Downward & Simona Rasciute, 2011. "An Economic Analysis of the Subjective Health and Well-being of Physical Activity," Chapters,in: The Economics of Sport, Health and Happiness, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    23. Pamela Wicker & Dennis Coates & Christoph Breuer, 2015. "The effect of a four-week fitness program on satisfaction with health and life," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 41-47, January.
    24. Sotiriadou, Popi & Wicker, Pamela, 2014. "Examining the participation patterns of an ageing population with disabilities in Australia," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 35-48.
    25. Caruso, Raul & Di Domizio, Marco, 2013. "International hostility and aggressiveness on the soccer pitch Evidence from European Championships and World Cups for the period 2000-2012," MPRA Paper 50099, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis


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