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Health as a predictor of early retirement before and after introduction of a flexible statutory pension age in Finland

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  • Leinonen, Taina
  • Laaksonen, Mikko
  • Chandola, Tarani
  • Martikainen, Pekka

Abstract

Little is known of how pension reforms affect the retirement decisions of people with different health statuses, although this is crucial for the understanding of the broader societal impact of pension policies and for future policy development. We assessed how the Finnish statutory pension age reform introduced in 2005 influenced the role of health as a predictor of retirement.

Suggested Citation

  • Leinonen, Taina & Laaksonen, Mikko & Chandola, Tarani & Martikainen, Pekka, 2016. "Health as a predictor of early retirement before and after introduction of a flexible statutory pension age in Finland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 149-157.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:158:y:2016:i:c:p:149-157
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.04.029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dudel & Mikko Myrskylä, 2016. "Recent trends in US working life expectancy at age 50 by gender, education, and race/ethnicity and the impact of the Great Recession," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2016-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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