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Communal bereavement and resilience in the aftermath of a terrorist event: Evidence from a natural experiment

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  • Tsai, Alexander C.
  • Venkataramani, Atheendar S.

Abstract

Sociological analyses of the psychological distress experienced by persons indirectly exposed to traumatic stressors have been conceptualized as a form of communal bereavement, defined by Catalano and Hartig (2001) as the experience of distress among persons not attached to the deceased. Their theory predicts communal bereavement responses particularly in the setting of loss of essential state, religious, or economic institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Tsai, Alexander C. & Venkataramani, Atheendar S., 2015. "Communal bereavement and resilience in the aftermath of a terrorist event: Evidence from a natural experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 155-163.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:146:y:2015:i:c:p:155-163
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.10.050
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew E. Clark & Orla Doyle & Elena Stancanelli, 2017. "The Impact of Terrorism on Well-being: Evidence from the Boston Marathon Bombing," Working Papers 201717, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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