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Where to snuff the puff? Relative effectiveness of U.S. smoking control policies

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  • Goel, Rajeev K.

Abstract

This research examines the relative effectiveness of various smoking control initiatives in lowering U.S. smoking prevalence. The main contribution lies in considering alternate state-level restrictions on retailers as well as smokers. Greater restrictions on smokers lower smoking prevalence, while those directed at retailers are largely ineffective. Upon disaggregation, territorial restrictions banning smoking in restaurants are found to be effective, whereas those in workplaces and in bars do not appreciably lower smoking prevalence. We also find some gender differences in the effectiveness of smoking restrictions. These findings are generally robust to alternate model specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Goel, Rajeev K., 2013. "Where to snuff the puff? Relative effectiveness of U.S. smoking control policies," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 97-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:44:y:2013:i:c:p:97-102
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2013.02.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baltagi, Badi H & Levin, Dan, 1986. "Estimating Dynamic Demand for Cigarettes Using Panel Data: The Effects of Bootlegging, Taxation and Advertising Reconsidered," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 148-155, February.
    2. Frank J. Chaloupka & Henry Saffer, 1992. "Clean Indoor Air Laws And The Demand For Cigarettes," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 10(2), pages 72-83, April.
    3. Rhoads, Jennifer K., 2012. "The effect of comprehensive state tobacco control programs on adult cigarette smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 393-405.
    4. Frank A. Sloan & Justin G. Trogdon, 2004. "The impact of the master settlement agreement on cigarette consumption," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 843-855.
    5. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Warner, Kenneth E., 2000. "The economics of smoking," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 29, pages 1539-1627 Elsevier.
    6. J. Dunham & ML. Marlow, 2000. "Smoking laws and their differential effects on restaurants, bars, and taverns," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(3), pages 326-333, July.
    7. Lanoie, Paul & Leclair, Paul, 1998. "Taxation or regulation:: Looking for a good anti-smoking policy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 85-89, January.
    8. Dunham, John & Marlow, Michael L, 2000. "The Effects of Smoking Laws on Seating Allocations of Restaurants, Bars, and Taverns," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(1), pages 151-157, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Goel, Rajeev K. & Payne, James E. & Saunoris, James W., 2016. "Spillovers from the beer market to U.S. cigarette demand," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 292-297.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Smoking; Restrictions; Retailers; Restaurants; Bars; Bans; Gender;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents

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