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Can public policy deter smoking escalation among young adults?


  • John A. Tauras

    (University of Illinois, Chicago)


In the wake of significant budget shortfalls, 37 states and the District of Columbia have recently increased cigarette excise taxes to boost revenues. This study examines the impact of increasing the price of cigarettes, which will occur as a consequence of cigarette excise tax increases, and implementing restrictions on smoking in private worksites, restaurants, government worksites, healthcare facilities, and other public places on young adult smoking progression. This paper employs nationally representative longitudinal data on young adults from the Monitoring the Future Surveys matched with information on site-specific prices and smokefree air laws. The estimates clearly indicate that increasing the price of cigarettes would substantially decrease the number of young adults who progress into higher intensities of smoking. In addition, private worksite restrictions and restrictions on smoking in other public places are found to decrease moderate smoking uptake among young adults. © 2005 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

Suggested Citation

  • John A. Tauras, 2005. "Can public policy deter smoking escalation among young adults?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 771-784.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:24:y:2005:i:4:p:771-784 DOI: 10.1002/pam.20137

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cawley, John & Markowitz, Sara & Tauras, John, 2004. "Lighting up and slimming down: the effects of body weight and cigarette prices on adolescent smoking initiation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 293-311, March.
    2. Lewit, Eugene M & Coate, Douglas & Grossman, Michael, 1981. "The Effects of Government Regulation on Teenage Smoking," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 545-569, December.
    3. Frank J. Chaloupka & Michael Grossman, 1996. "Price, Tobacco Control Policies and Youth Smoking," NBER Working Papers 5740, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. John A. Tauras, 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of Adult Cigarette Demand," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 31(3), pages 361-375, Summer.
    5. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Wechsler, Henry, 1997. "Price, tobacco control policies and smoking among young adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 359-373, June.
    6. John A. Tauras & Frank J. Chaloupka, 1999. "Determinants of Smoking Cessation: An Analysis of Young Adult Men and Women," NBER Working Papers 7262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sen Anindya & Ariizumi Hideki & Driambe Daciana, 2010. "Do Changes In Cigarette Taxes Impact Youth Smoking? Evidence from Canadian Provinces," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-25, August.
    2. Christina Czart Ciecierski & Pinka Chatterji & Frank J. Chaloupka & Henry Wechsler, 2011. "Do state expenditures on tobacco control programs decrease use of tobacco products among college students?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 253-272, March.
    3. McGeary, Kerry Anne, 2013. "The impact of state-level nutrition-education program funding on BMI: Evidence from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 67-78.
    4. Goel, Rajeev K., 2013. "Where to snuff the puff? Relative effectiveness of U.S. smoking control policies," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 97-102.
    5. Levy, David T. & Hyland, Andrew & Higbee, Cheryl & Remer, Lillian & Compton, Christine, 2007. "The role of public policies in reducing smoking prevalence in California: Results from the California Tobacco Policy Simulation Model," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 167-185, July.

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