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Money and risk of loss in an asset market segmentation model

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  • Choi, Hyung Sun

Abstract

A simple asset market segmentation model is constructed to study the relationship between inflation and theft when money is the only medium of exchange. In equilibrium, money is nonneutral and monetary policy has asymmetric effects on theft, real money holding, and consumption. The distributional effects persist over periods and the liquidity effect may arise. Next, given the asymmetric effects of monetary policy, the crime rates differ across economic individuals in order to smooth out consumption fluctuations. Given the conditions of stealing technology, monetary equilibrium would not be always sustainable. Finally, the optimal money growth rate is to minimize theft and the Friedman rule is suboptimal.

Suggested Citation

  • Choi, Hyung Sun, 2013. "Money and risk of loss in an asset market segmentation model," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 146-155.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reveco:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:146-155
    DOI: 10.1016/j.iref.2012.07.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Choi, Hyung Sun, 2014. "Money, credit, risk of loss, and limited participation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 9-23.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money; Theft; Asset market segmentation; Distributional effect; Friedman rule;

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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