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LED standardization in China and South East Asia: Stakeholders, infrastructure and institutional regimes

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  • van de Kaa, Geerten
  • Greeven, Mark

Abstract

LED is now becoming the new standard in lighting solutions in developed countries. However, in developing countries, it is not yet used on a large scale. One of the reasons is a lack of established regional standards for LED. An institutional infrastructure for standardization is one of the essential elements for the establishment of common standards. We examine the institutional infrastructure for LED lighting in China, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia by conducting a stakeholder analysis. Although many stakeholders are involved in LED standardization in these countries, each country has a distinct standardization process. We argue that the institutional environment in these countries influences the role of stakeholders in the standardization process. We distinguish these five countries in terms of their standardization regime shaped by political, professional, and business interests, which are represented by the stakeholders involved in the standardization process.

Suggested Citation

  • van de Kaa, Geerten & Greeven, Mark, 2017. "LED standardization in China and South East Asia: Stakeholders, infrastructure and institutional regimes," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 863-870.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:72:y:2017:i:c:p:863-870
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2017.01.101
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