IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/rensus/v21y2013icp444-455.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How many jobs can the RES-E sectors generate in the Portuguese context?

Author

Listed:
  • Oliveira, C.
  • Coelho, D.
  • Pereira da Silva, P.
  • Antunes, C.H.

Abstract

In the last years Portugal has been at the forefront in the deployment of electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E). The Portuguese national energy strategy 2020 (NES 2020) aims to reinforce Portugal’s leadership in sustainable energy and to attain the ambitious goals set in the government programme, namely consolidating the renewable energies cluster in Portugal, which will represent approximately by 2020 more than three times the 35,000 jobs estimated in 2010 and further developing the industrial cluster related with energy efficiency, creating 21,000 new jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliveira, C. & Coelho, D. & Pereira da Silva, P. & Antunes, C.H., 2013. "How many jobs can the RES-E sectors generate in the Portuguese context?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 444-455.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:21:y:2013:i:c:p:444-455
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2013.01.011
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032113000427
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tourkolias, C. & Mirasgedis, S. & Damigos, D. & Diakoulaki, D., 2009. "Employment benefits of electricity generation: A comparative assessment of lignite and natural gas power plants in Greece," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 4155-4166, October.
    2. Peet, N.J., 1986. "Energy requirements of output of the New Zealand economy, 1976–1977," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 11(7), pages 659-670.
    3. Oliveira, Carla & Antunes, Carlos Henggeler, 2011. "A multi-objective multi-sectoral economy–energy–environment model: Application to Portugal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 2856-2866.
    4. Hawdon, David & Pearson, Peter, 1995. "Input-output simulations of energy, environment, economy interactions in the UK," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 73-86, January.
    5. Lambert, Rosebud Jasmine & Silva, Patrícia Pereira, 2012. "The challenges of determining the employment effects of renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 4667-4674.
    6. Henriques, C. Oliveira & Antunes, C. Henggeler, 2012. "Interactions of economic growth, energy consumption and the environment in the context of the crisis – A study with uncertain data," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 415-422.
    7. Blanco, Maria Isabel & Rodrigues, Glória, 2009. "Direct employment in the wind energy sector: An EU study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2847-2857, August.
    8. Wei, Max & Patadia, Shana & Kammen, Daniel M., 2010. "Putting renewables and energy efficiency to work: How many jobs can the clean energy industry generate in the US?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 919-931, February.
    9. Gay, Philip W. & Proops, John L.R., 1993. "Carbon---dioxide production by the UK economy: An input-output assessment," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 113-130.
    10. Cai, Wenjia & Wang, Can & Chen, Jining & Wang, Siqiang, 2011. "Green economy and green jobs: Myth or reality? The case of China’s power generation sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 5994-6003.
    11. Borges, Ana Rosa & Antunes, Carlos Henggeler, 2003. "A fuzzy multiple objective decision support model for energy-economy planning," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 145(2), pages 304-316, March.
    12. Oliveira, Carla & Antunes, Carlos Henggeler, 2004. "A multiple objective model to deal with economy-energy-environment interactions," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 153(2), pages 370-385, March.
    13. Llera Sastresa, Eva & Usón, Alfonso Aranda & Bribián, Ignacio Zabalza & Scarpellini, Sabina, 2010. "Local impact of renewables on employment: Assessment methodology and case study," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 679-690, February.
    14. Mu, Tao & Xia, Qing & Kang, Chongqing, 2010. "Input-output table of electricity demand and its application," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 326-331.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Sufang & Chen, Yang & Liu, Xiaoli & Yang, Mengshi & Xu, Liang, 2017. "Employment effects of solar PV industry in China: A spreadsheet-based analytical model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 59-65.
    2. de Carvalho, Ariovaldo Lopes & Henggeler Antunes, Carlos & Freire, Fausto & Oliveira Henriques, Carla, 2016. "A multi-objective interactive approach to assess economic-energy-environment trade-offs in Brazil," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1429-1442.
    3. Behrens, Paul & Rodrigues, João F.D. & Brás, Tiago & Silva, Carlos, 2016. "Environmental, economic, and social impacts of feed-in tariffs: A Portuguese perspective 2000–2010," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 309-319.
    4. Simas, Moana & Pacca, Sergio, 2014. "Assessing employment in renewable energy technologies: A case study for wind power in Brazil," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 83-90.
    5. C. Oliveira & D. Coelho & C. H. Antunes, 2016. "Coupling input–output analysis with multiobjective linear programming models for the study of economy–energy–environment–social (E3S) trade-offs: a review," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 247(2), pages 471-502, December.
    6. Cartelle Barros, Juan José & Lara Coira, Manuel & de la Cruz López, María Pilar & del Caño Gochi, Alfredo, 2017. "Comparative analysis of direct employment generated by renewable and non-renewable power plants," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 542-554.
    7. Damien Bazin & Amna Omri & Nouri Chtourou, 2015. "Solar Thermal Energy for Sustainable Development in Tunisia," Post-Print halshs-01070616, HAL.
    8. Cameron, Lachlan & van der Zwaan, Bob, 2015. "Employment factors for wind and solar energy technologies: A literature review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 160-172.
    9. Zerrahn, Alexander, 2017. "Wind Power and Externalities," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 245-260.
    10. Mu, Yaqian & Cai, Wenjia & Evans, Samuel & Wang, Can & Roland-Holst, David, 2018. "Employment impacts of renewable energy policies in China: A decomposition analysis based on a CGE modeling framework," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 210(C), pages 256-267.
    11. Kabayo, Jeremiah & Marques, Pedro & Garcia, Rita & Freire, Fausto, 2019. "Life-cycle sustainability assessment of key electricity generation systems in Portugal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 131-142.
    12. Omri, Emna & Chtourou, Nouri & Bazin, Damien, 2015. "Solar thermal energy for sustainable development in Tunisia: The case of the PROSOL project," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1312-1323.
    13. Ortega, Margarita & Río, Pablo del & Ruiz, Pablo & Thiel, Christian, 2015. "Employment effects of renewable electricity deployment. A novel methodology," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 940-951.
    14. Pikas, Ergo & Kurnitski, Jarek & Thalfeldt, Martin & Koskela, Lauri, 2017. "Cost-benefit analysis of nZEB energy efficiency strategies with on-site photovoltaic generation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 291-301.
    15. Yuan, Rong & Rodrigues, João F.D. & Tukker, Arnold & Behrens, Paul, 2018. "The impact of the expansion in non-fossil electricity infrastructure on China’s carbon emissions," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 228(C), pages 1994-2008.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:21:y:2013:i:c:p:444-455. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/600126/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.