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The challenges of determining the employment effects of renewable energy

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  • Lambert, Rosebud Jasmine
  • Silva, Patrícia Pereira

Abstract

The benefits of promoting renewable energy are regularly claimed to be energy security, climate change mitigation and job creation. While the first two benefits are generally accepted, the impact of renewable energy on employment is still disputed. This paper presents a discussion of the various factors that influence the analysis of renewable energy and its impact on employment. The advantages and disadvantages of input–output methods and analysis methods are discussed as well as the issues surrounding the measurement of job creation. A critical evaluation of the literature reveals factors that should be considered when completing a study about renewable energy and employment: labour intensity of renewables; cost increases and availability of investments; counting job losses; job quality and skills, model assumptions and sources of information. Analytical studies using extensive surveys were found to be more appropriate for regional studies while input–output methods were better suited to national and international studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Lambert, Rosebud Jasmine & Silva, Patrícia Pereira, 2012. "The challenges of determining the employment effects of renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 4667-4674.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:16:y:2012:i:7:p:4667-4674
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2012.03.072
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Employment; Renewable energy; Job creation;

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