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A spatial model of school district open enrollment choice

Author

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  • Brasington, David
  • Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso
  • Guci, Ledia

Abstract

We provide an analysis of the determinants of adoption of inter-district open enrollment policies by school districts in Ohio. Legislation passed in 1997 allows Ohio's school districts to adopt one of the following open enrollment options: 1) prohibit enrollment of students from any other school district in the state (no open enrollment), 2) permit enrollment of students from adjacent school districts, or 3) permit enrollment of students from any school district in the state. We employ a recently developed spatial autoregressive lag multinomial logit model to examine the determinants of adoption of each open enrollment alternative. Among the most influential factors are school districts' demographic characteristics, financial factors, and competitive environment. More importantly, the results show evidence of strategic interaction, with a positive correlation in policy choice between neighboring school districts of about 0.4.

Suggested Citation

  • Brasington, David & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso & Guci, Ledia, 2016. "A spatial model of school district open enrollment choice," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:56:y:2016:i:c:p:1-18
    DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2015.10.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:regeco:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:77-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:regeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:64-77 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:regeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:89-103 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School district open enrollment policy; Spatial multinomial logit; Spatial autoregressive lag; School choice;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • R51 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Finance in Urban and Rural Economies

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