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Poisson indices of segregation

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  • Mele, Angelo

Abstract

Existing indices of residential segregation are based on a partition of the city in neighborhoods: given a spatial distribution of racial groups, the index measures different segregation levels for different partitions. I propose a spatial approach, which estimates segregation at the individual level and produces the entire spatial distribution of segregation. This method provides different rankings of cities in terms of segregation and new insights on the effect of segregation on socioeconomic outcomes. Using Census data and controlling for endogeneity using instrumental variables, I show that reduced form estimates of the impact of segregation on socioeconomic outcomes are not robust to the spatial approach.

Suggested Citation

  • Mele, Angelo, 2013. "Poisson indices of segregation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 65-85.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:43:y:2013:i:1:p:65-85
    DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2012.04.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert Hutchens, 2004. "One Measure of Segregation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 555-578, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Florent Dubois & Christophe Muller, 2017. "Decomposing Well-being Measures in South Africa: The Contribution of Residential Segregation to Income Distribution," AMSE Working Papers 1719, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    2. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro & Matt Taddy, 2016. "Measuring Group Differences in High-Dimensional Choices: Method and Application to Congressional Speech," NBER Working Papers 22423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:eee:exehis:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:40-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Lévêque, Christophe & Saleh, Mohamed, 2016. "Does Industrialization Affect Segregation? Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Cairo," IAST Working Papers 16-63, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST), revised May 2017.
    5. repec:spr:metron:v:75:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40300-017-0112-4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spatial segregation; Spatial processes; Nonparametric estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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