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The properties of realized correlation: Evidence from the French, German and Greek equity markets


  • Vortelinos, Dimitrios I.


In this paper I examine the properties of four realized correlation estimators and model their jumps. The correlations are between the French, German and Greek equity markets. Using intraday data I first construct four state-of-the-art realized correlation estimators which I then use to testing for normality, long-memory, asymmetries and jumps and also to modeling for jumps. Jumps are detected when the realized correlation is higher than 0.99 and lower than 0.01 in absolute values. Then the realized correlation is modeled with the simple Heterogeneous Autoregressive (HAR) model and the Heterogeneous Autoregressive model with Jumps (HAR-J).

Suggested Citation

  • Vortelinos, Dimitrios I., 2010. "The properties of realized correlation: Evidence from the French, German and Greek equity markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 273-290, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:50:y:2010:i:3:p:273-290

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lidan Grossmass, 2014. "Obtaining and Predicting the Bounds of Realized Correlations," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 150(III), pages 191-226, September.
    2. Isao Ishida & Michael McAleer & Kosuke Oya, 2011. "Estimating the leverage parameter of continuous-time stochastic volatility models using high frequency S&P 500 and VIX," Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(11), pages 1048-1067, September.
    3. Nikolaos Sariannidis & Polyxeni Papadopoulou & Evangelos Drimbetas, 2015. "Investigation of the Greek Stock Exchange volatility and the impact of foreign markets from 2007 to 2012," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 8(2), pages 55-68, October.


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