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Tax policy and the financing of innovation

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  • Bryce Campodonico, Luis A.
  • Bonfatti, Roberto
  • Pisano, Luigi

Abstract

We study tax policy in a Schumpeterian growth model with asymmetric information in the financing of innovation. Investors cannot a priori distinguish between more or less talented entrepreneurs. Net-worth allows talented entrepreneurs to self-invest and avoid being pooled with less talented entrepreneurs in the credit market. Increasing net-worth boosts innovation even when financed through higher profit taxes. Taxing consumption effectively raises net-worth and subsidizes profits simultaneously. Sufficiently taxing consumption implements the social optimum free of adverse selection. If forced to tax consumption less, the government implements a second best allocation with adverse selection when boosting net-worth enough to avoid adverse selection requires taxing profits excessively.

Suggested Citation

  • Bryce Campodonico, Luis A. & Bonfatti, Roberto & Pisano, Luigi, 2016. "Tax policy and the financing of innovation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 32-46.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:135:y:2016:i:c:p:32-46
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2015.12.010
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Bonfatti & Luis A. Bryce Campodonico & Luigi Pisano, 2018. "Reconciling the original Schumpeterian Model with the observed inverted-U relationship between competition and innovation," Discussion Papers 2018-03, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    2. Su, Zhong-qin & Xiao, Zuoping & Yu, Lin, 2019. "Do political connections enhance or impede corporate innovation?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 94-110.
    3. Cheng, Lei & Cheng, Hong & Zhuang, Ziyin, 2019. "Political connections, corporate innovation and entrepreneurship: Evidence from the China Employer-Employee Survey (CEES)," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 286-305.
    4. Durusu-Ciftci, Dilek & Gokmenoglu, Korhan K. & Yetkiner, Hakan, 2018. "The heterogeneous impact of taxation on economic development: New insights from a panel cointegration approach," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 503-513.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovation; Tax policy; Asymmetric information; Adverse selection;

    JEL classification:

    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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